Pajamas Created to Monitor an Infant’s Vital Stats, Sends Mobile Alerts

Every parent worries, at some point or another, about if their child is breathing, too hot, or too cold while they are sleeping, right? In 2010, Exmovere’s released “Exmobaby” pajamas that measured infants’ temperature and movements through sensors embedded in the pajamas. However, with the announcement that Rogers Communications has combined efforts with Exmovere’s, these “Exmobaby” pajamas are about to have a makeover.

A new feature will be added to the pajamas that transmits information to a parents smartphone, tablet, and a variety of other devices. This is the first “wearable” monitoring system for infants but is added to a growing line of other wearable systems that have been created for adults. Cory Shultz, a iMedicalApps blogger, said:

Rogers sees this as a necessary push in the already saturated mobile data market. By offering a service like this to its customers, it hopes to capture a new market segment that will be dependent on mobile data for continual use.

Since just about everything is going mobile (or so it seems), it makes sense that this Exmovere’s and Rogers Communications are trying to create something to satisfy customer’s needs. If these pajamas really work, it seems like a great product for children who may be ill or have other health problems. The feature that sends information to a mobile app will probably put some parent’s minds at ease when they leave their child with someone else, or when they are in an area of the house that isn’t near the child. I don’t think it is necessary for all parents to rush out and buy this product , but there could be a time and a place for it. Maybe these pajamas could be given to children that may need additional monitoring after leaving the hospital, and a doctor could receive alerts as well if their vital stats fall below satisfactory levels. It would seem that the possibilities are endless.

The wearable sensor market seems to be growing a lot lately, doesn’t it? Exmobaby pajamas appear to be one of the less-complicated ones. What do you think about the growing trend of wearable sensors?

“Rogers sees this as a necessary push in the already saturated mobile data market,” iMedicalApps blogger Cory Shultz says. ”By offering a service like this to its customers, it hopes to capture a new market segment that will be dependent on mobile data for continual use.”