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Future of Mobile Devices Infographic

The explosion of mobile devices and other connected devices is really quite astounding. It’s the start of what people call the IoT and it’s going to change everything including health care. You can see that in this Mobile Future infographic below. The thing that stood out to me was that 44ZB of data will be exchanged between connected devices by 2020. For those not familiar with ZB, that’s 1 trillion Gigabytes! Wow! Now that’s big data.

A Look at the Mobile Health Future Infographic

November 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Mobile Health Care, Rise in Deaths, and Patient First Apps – Around Twitter

Here’s a few tweets that stood out to me this week. Plus a little commentary on each.


These numbers are pretty shocking. More people get health information online than a whole slew of other popular online services. This is shocking because almost none of that health information is actually coming from providers. It’s coming from other sources.


I guess we shouldn’t be surprised by this rise in deaths. I’m not sure what health care can do to solve this rise. I think this requires a change in culture more than a change in health care. (some might argue that culture is part of health care)


The patient first mentality is an important one. I’m always surprised how many patient apps are built with very little involvement from actual patients.

November 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Fitness Tracking Apps and Cell Phone Batteries

One of the big challenges of any mobile health app is how much it drains your battery. While processing power, storage, and pretty much every other technology in a cell phone has improved the one nut we haven’t yet cracked is batteries. Although, I’m hopeful that we’re close to cracking the innovation in batteries soon too.

Until we do, battery usage is always a concern with mobile health applications. This is particularly true with passive activity tracking apps. They can suck your battery dry if they’re not designed properly and we all know how quickly apps get removed from our phones if they’re responsible for reducing our battery life.

One passive fitness tracker, Human, has tackled this problem head on. Here’s how Techcrunch describes their efforts to minimize Human’s drain on your battery:

The app now relies as much as possible on the motion coprocessor in your iPhone 5s, 6 or 6s. Human now has 50 percent less battery impact. And if you really need to get the most out of your phone, there is a new low power mode to reduce battery usage by up to 90 percent.

Until we solve the batter problems we all face, we’re going to see more effort spent on how we manage battery usage. We saw the same problem with the original Google Glass. The battery on the original Google Glass was about 30 minutes of active usage (ie. video). I read one report that Google Glass 2.0 is going to last 22 hours by comparison.

What other battery improvements do you see happening to help mobile health applications?

November 4, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.