Free Smart Phone Healthcare Newsletter Want to receive the latest updates on smart phones, gadgets and technology for healthcare? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to Smart Phone HC for FREE!

The $5 Billion Eye and Gesture Tracking Sensor Market

Eye Tracking and Gesture Tracking Sensors

$5 Billion is a huge number for the eye and gesture tracking sensor market. It’s amazing how these markets slowly creep up until they become something huge. There are a number of really interesting startups that are working on eye and gesture tracking sensors.

This news is particularly interesting as Samsung just announced the Galaxy Note 7 will include iris scanning. It will help secure the device, but will also be available in other apps in the phone so that you have a true single sign on with your iris. We’ll see if they open it up for eye tracking applications as well.

As you look at the development curves of these technologies, we’re still in the very early stages. That’s what gets me most excited. The eye is indeed a window into our health in many ways. I can’t wait to see the new health innovations that come from it. At $5 billion, that market is really starting to mature.

August 3, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Fitness Tracking Apps and Cell Phone Batteries

One of the big challenges of any mobile health app is how much it drains your battery. While processing power, storage, and pretty much every other technology in a cell phone has improved the one nut we haven’t yet cracked is batteries. Although, I’m hopeful that we’re close to cracking the innovation in batteries soon too.

Until we do, battery usage is always a concern with mobile health applications. This is particularly true with passive activity tracking apps. They can suck your battery dry if they’re not designed properly and we all know how quickly apps get removed from our phones if they’re responsible for reducing our battery life.

One passive fitness tracker, Human, has tackled this problem head on. Here’s how Techcrunch describes their efforts to minimize Human’s drain on your battery:

The app now relies as much as possible on the motion coprocessor in your iPhone 5s, 6 or 6s. Human now has 50 percent less battery impact. And if you really need to get the most out of your phone, there is a new low power mode to reduce battery usage by up to 90 percent.

Until we solve the batter problems we all face, we’re going to see more effort spent on how we manage battery usage. We saw the same problem with the original Google Glass. The battery on the original Google Glass was about 30 minutes of active usage (ie. video). I read one report that Google Glass 2.0 is going to last 22 hours by comparison.

What other battery improvements do you see happening to help mobile health applications?

November 4, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Microsoft HoloLens Used for Medical Education

Microsoft HoloLens together with Case Western Reserve University has put together a video which shows how HoloLens could be used to create 3D visualizations of the human anatomy. Check out the video below:

This is pretty cool stuff and you can see how this type of 3D visualization of the human anatomy will change how you educate doctors. There’s nothing quite like seeing the actual organ. That’s why doctors do so much work on cadavers. However, this HoloLens visualization gets pretty close with far fewer regulations.

I think this is just the start though. Why couldn’t this be used to educate patients as well? No doubt there will be some direct to consumer apps. However, it would be pretty neat for a doctor to have you put one of these on and then they walk you through what’s going to happen in the operation. I imagine in some operations this could be really helpful for a patient. In some cases it might scare the patient. That will take some learning.

July 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Wearable Tech and Form Factor

This tweet really got my juices flowing as I consider the movement with wearable tech and the various form factors we see hitting the mobile health world.

I love when someone immediately discounts a form factor as something that people won’t use. You have to remember that their response is just one data point. There could be an entire customer segment that will have no problem with or may even prefer that form factor.

I think we have to remember that we’re still in the very early stages of figuring out which mobile health form factors are going to become most popular. What’s not going to change is the impact of having an always on, always connected device attached to a variety of sensors. This is the future of mobile health regardless of the various form factors.

March 5, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Brainwaves and Google Glass – mHealth Summit

While at the mHealth Summit I had a chance to meet with Cerora. At first I wasn’t all that excited to see another piece of EEG hardware. I’d seen one before, and it seemed the science of it was so early that we still hadn’t seen many real world results that were worth talking about. However, when I started talking to the people at Cerora, I was impressed by their linear focus on using the hardware for just one purpose as opposed to a company with a technology that’s trying to find a solution. Plus, I love that they had plenty of clinical study background as well.

However, the device itself still wasn’t as interesting to me as how they would pair the EEG with Google Glass. Sure, Google Glass seems like just another toy, but they had a vision for how to use Google Glass that I hadn’t heard before. They were interested in using the accelerometer in Google Glass and I believe they said the eye tracking potential to be able to monitor someone’s gait. For example, when they walked were they swaying from side to side in an abnormal way.

To be honest, I may not even be doing justice to what they have in mind. However, the concept is what I found most interesting. Could Google Glass be used as an amazing health tracking device or as a health research device? I think Cerora might be on to something combining Google Glass with their EEG.

January 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Google Glass in Public

I recently acquired a pair of Google Glass. It’s been quite an interesting experience wearing them around. I haven’t worn them many places. In fact, I took them to the mHealth Summit in DC and barely took them out. As I considered it, I found it really pretentious to have on a pair of Google Glass. Even when I did wear them, I’d usually flip them up on my head so people knew I wasn’t using them.

I imagine over time this will change as more and more people wear some sort of eyeware that contains computing power like Google Glass. However, of all places, you’d think that wearing them at mHealth Summit people would generally know what they were and not be so phased when you had them on. It was interesting to see the looks people gave you.

I will say that wearing Google Glass is a good attention getter. Random people will come up to you and ask to wear them or try them. This can be a great thing at a conference where breaking the ice can be hard. However, you just have to be sure to bridge the conversation to something more than Google Glass. For some reason, women seemed particularly interested in them.

I have CES (Consumer Electronics Show) coming up in a few weeks. I think I’ll wear Google Glass around some just to see what people do. At a show like CES I’m afraid I’ll end up meeting a lot of people that I don’t necessarily want to meet (do I really care to hear about your iPhone case company?).

I’m still torn on Google Glass. I think the technology is a really amazing experience. It’s just hard for me to see it as an every day type of accessory like your phone. Maybe I’ll hop on eBay and sell mine off.

December 26, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

What’s Next for Smartphone Innovation?

GigaOm recently reported that Apple is working on a curved screen smartphone and pressure-sensitive touch censors for future iPhones.

Samsung had already announced a curved screen smartphone as is demonstrated in this video:

As I think about these new smartphone innovations, I don’t see anything real game changing with this technology. Certainly I understand that the biggest game changers in technology are often when a company combines a bunch of relatively innocuous innovations into one tight package. I believe the iPhone is the perfect example of this principle.

With that said, I have to feel a little disappointed by even the small innovations that are coming out in the latest smartphones. Bigger screens, curved glass, and pressure sensitive sensors don’t do much for me. I’d love to hear what you think about the pace of smartphone innovation. What could they innovate that would really be a game changing innovation for healthcare?

The hardware piece aside, I think on the smartphone software side there is still a ton of potential for innovation coming very soon. We’ll see where it takes us. I’m not expecting huge hardware innovation in smartphones anytime soon. When it comes to eyewear computing like Google Glass, that’s a different story.

November 13, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Google Glass Competitor Adds Augmented Reality

We’ve written a number of times about the power and potential of Google Glass in healthcare. I have little doubt that Google has started a whole new computing platform with Google Glass. However, a year or so ago Kyle Samani from Pristine suggested to me that some of the Google Glass competitors could be even more powerful with Google Glass. Now that Pristine is deep into the development of their Google Glass product, I wonder if Kyle’s views have changed. Personally, I’m growing to think that he could be right.

I recently came across the Google Glass competitor META.01. It’s a pretty unique product that adds augmented reality to the experience of eyeware computing. Plus, they say they’re working on making the eyeware “fashion-conscious.” This point is what many are waiting for with eyeware computing.

Instead of telling you about their product, this video does a good job showing it:

I think the future of eyeware computing is bright and will benefit healthcare. Google has definitely done a great job creating the space, but I won’t be surprised if their competitors end up defining it.

September 24, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.