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Growth of the Wearables Market Dominated by Healthcare

wearable-market-growth

This chart illustrates an incredible explosion in the wearables market and illustrates how it’s likely to continue to grow for years to come. The big takeaway for me is how healthcare totally dominates these graphs. The two biggest growth markets for wearable are “Healthcare” and “Sports/Activity Trackers.” Many would argue that Sports/Activity trackers should be included in healthcare. That’s amazing.

The only other wearable that gets reasonably close is the smart watches, but even those could be argued as healthcare devices as well. Sure, they do a lot more, but they all have some sort of health component to them as well.

I’m going to point to these graphs from now on when I talk about the impact of wearables on healthcare. Although, I guess I could also say that the wearables market is largely healthcare. I’m excited by this continued growth and I still think we’re just getting started on what will be possible. Watch out for wearables major impact on healthcare. I think it’s inevitable.

September 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

American Well Patents Are Unenforceable

Good news today for the telemedicine industry as the federal courts ruled that American Well’s telemedicine patents are unenforceable in their case against Teladoc. Here’s an excerpt from Mobi Health News on the decision:

It’s looking more and more like the path to victory in the major turf wars of digital health will not be through patent litigation.

Earlier this week, a Massachusetts federal judge Indira Talwani ruled that American Well’s telehealth patents, which the company had sued Teladoc for allegedly infringing, were unenforceably broad. She cited the same Supreme Court precedent, Alice v. CLS Bank, that an ITC judge used to invalidate Jawbone’s patents last month in the tracker company’s battle with Fitbit.

I love the way Jonah Comstock from Mobi Health News described the decision. The path to victory won’t be based on patent litigation. Let’s hope that Jonah is right since patent litigation is an awful way to create a market. That’s true for telemedicine and the health sensor market. There’s a supposed PHR patent out there which needs to be invalidated the same way.

As you can see, I’m not a huge fan of software patents. It’s pretty hard to make the case for the innovation that you’re really trying to accomplish. Plus, far too many software patents are held by patent trolls. In this case, it’s a bit better since American Well has built a legitimate telemedicine business and isn’t just relying on their patent. That’s a good thing and it’s healthy to have Teladoc, American Well, MDLive and others battling it out in the market.

I’m glad to see the federal courts ruling on this. American Well is looking to appeal the decision, so it’s not over yet, but I’m hoping the result of their appeal is the same. We’ll all be better with that patent being unenforcable.

September 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Speed of Innovation in Mobile Networks – Enabling The Future of Healthcare

I’ve been attending the CTIA Super Mobility Conference in Las Vegas today and it’s been eye opening to say the least. The efforts they’re making to make wireless networks work for the IOT (internet of things) and even things like drones is incredible. Much of the buzz at the event has also been around the coming 5G networks.

Matt Grop EVP and CTO at Qualcomm offered this comparison of the progression from voice to 4G LTE to 5G:

Later, Rajeev Suir, President and CEO of Nokia, then suggested that we need 5G networks because the applications of the future will require it. This is an interesting statement to consider. Today during my Healthcare API discussion the need for faster connections came up and illustrated how healthcare could benefit from this additional speed. In fact, the innovations in healthcare are likely going to be facilitated or even demand the faster speeds to become a reality.

Think about neural networks and genomic medicine. That type of processing isn’t going to happen on the phone. The data for those won’t be stored on your phone, laptop, or desktop. It’s going to be stored and processed in the cloud and then sent back to your phone. The exchange of data that is going to need to happen is going to be huge and we’re going to need really fast networks to enable this future.

Think about all of the sensor data that is going to be reporting up to the cloud to be processed by these neural networks and pharmacogenomic processing engines. We’re not going to plug in to transfer this data. It’s going to use these ubiquitous wireless networks that currently connect our smart phones.

This all certainly leads to a fascinating future. I love the way technology can open the door to opportunities that would have never been thought possible previously. New high speed mobile networks like 5G are an example of that. The only question is if even 5G will be fast enough.

September 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Need for Consumer Health and Employer Health to Collide

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

A Towers Watson study looked at telehealth services that are offered by large employers. The main study result isn’t that surprising: more employers are offering telehealth services and more employers plan to offer telehealth services. This is part of a much larger trend where employers realize that easy access to health services is great for their employees and their business.

What was a bit surprising from the study was that despite offering telehealth services, many of the employees of these large companies aren’t actually using those services. Here’s how Megan Williams described this finding on the Insights blog:

The Towers Watson study in particular highlights one of the greatest challenges employers face in realizing the full benefit of telemedicine solutions — awareness. Many employees aren’t even aware of traditional options, so it’s highly likely that their options of digital health tools are being overlooked.

Why is it that consumers don’t realize the full breadth of telehealth options their employer provides?

The problem here is that most of us don’t look to our employer for healthcare. We look to them for insurance, but not health care. We don’t expect our employer to take an active interest in our health. In fact, often our employer would step away from suggesting “the best” doctors to us and just provide us the list of in-network doctors. It was up to us as patients to figure out who was “best.”

Given this dynamic, we’ve had to figure out how to navigate the healthcare system on our own. We were more likely to discover a new healthcare option through email, Facebook or Twitter than we were through our employer. To date, telehealth services have largely been consumer driven and so it’s no surprise that most patients discover telehealth services through other consumers and not their employer.

Will the day finally arrive that the consumer health options we seek overlap with the employer health options that my employer supports? I think we’re heading that direction. In the telemedicine space, for example, we’re starting to see some dominant industry players emerge. Large companies will only need to support a small set of telemedicine companies to cover their entire workforce and allow their employees to discover and use whichever telemedicine service they find on their own.

Patients’ interest in telehealth services will only continue to grow. Each of us has a smartphone in our pocket and we’re used to getting the answers to all our questions wherever we are and whatever we may be doing. The same is true for our health. Our health choices will be more influenced by our smartphone than our employer. That’s why employers need the consumer health and employer health worlds to collide.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

August 31, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Apple Is Making a Mistake Acquiring Gliimpse

The big news this week was that Apple has acquired PHR vendor Gliimpse. This was supposedly the first acquisition by Apple’s new Digital Health team. Plus, it’s the first big news since Tim Cook commented that Apple’s opportunity in healthcare “may even make the smartphone market look small.”

Many are touting this as a the start of the move by Apple into healthcare. No doubt it’s interesting that Apple would make a vertical acquisition like this, but it’s a mistake. Unfortunately, it’s a mistake that Apple is likely to do over and over again.

Apple certainly was and in many respects still is in a unique position to be able to innovate in healthcare thanks to its massive iPhone user population. They really could do some interesting things in healthcare since so many people have iPhones and so many healthcare companies want to say they’re working with Apple. The problem is that Apple doesn’t understand healthcare.

If you think this is a small thing, you’ve probably never tried to do a healthcare startup company. Healthcare is a unique market and requires a unique understanding to be successful. All the bravado in the world will only get you so far in the world of healthcare. Then, the harsh realities set in and you realize that the current against you is a lot stronger than you first realized.

Let’s take the example of the PHR Gliimpse (and generalizing to any PHR). This is a hard market with very little consumer demand. That’s been proven over and over again by hundreds of companies who have tried. The harsh reality is that most patients don’t care enough about their health to want to aggregate their health record. It’s worth noting that aggregating your health record is hard work. I even know one company that is paying doctors to send them health records and even then it’s hard to get doctors to act. Plus, there’s little value to healthy patients if they actually did aggregate their record. This is a tough, tough business.

Certainly, a case can be made for chronic patients that it’s worth the effort to aggregate this data into a PHR. Many have been doing this out of necessity. It was happening before cell phones became ubiquitous as people carried around massive folders or binders with their health records. While this value is understood, this makes for an extremely small market. When did Apple last do good in a small market? Is Apple going to really give up iPhone real estate when only a small portion of their users can actually get value from the PHR?

It’s great to have Apple interested in healthcare. However, I think the acquisition of a PHR company is a mistake and won’t yield them the rewards in healthcare that they seek. Of course, when you have a few billion to spend, what’s a few million on a PHR company? No doubt it’s a really small bet by Apple, but one that I don’t think will pay off for them. At least now they’ll have some people with health experience on the team and maybe they can innovate something new.

August 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Virtual Reality and Treating Dizziness

Mark Cuban has a pretty amazing post that talks about his experience as an active, engaged patient in his care and how he found virtual reality helped him achieve the desired relief from dizziness that he desired. If you’ve stayed up with the virtual reality space, you’ll find this quite intriguing since virtual reality is often condemned because of the dizziness it causes. Obviously, what you’re watching on VR matters a lot.

Go ahead and read Mark’s full post to see his experience as an active patient trying to deal with his Dizziness. We’ll be here when you get back. You can also watch this video he made:

It’s pretty amazing how active Mark Cuban was in his care. Sure, he has the money to be as active as possible. He literally was looking at buying a massive medical device or even investing in a business to bring the treatment he wanted to Dallas. That’s extraordinary and something that most of us can’t do as patients.

For those who haven’t read the whole story, Mark Cuban was getting treatment in California that was helping him with his dizziness from Dizziland.com. However, he couldn’t stay in California to finish the treatment. That’s when he discovered that the Samsung VR set he had might be the solution to creating a portable solution for him. Turns out, it did the trick for him. As a true businessman, he’s now working with the company to commercialize the product.

To be clear, this device setup is not FDA approved. It’s something that Mark found and tried that worked for him. We won’t be seeing doctors prescribing this for a while to come. Although, it will be interesting to see if and how solutions like this do go to market. Will they need to be FDA approved? Will they be regulated? How much will they cost? Lots of interesting questions since the videos and technology to watch them are quite cheap.

I love the story of technology making an impact on someone’s health for good. I also love seeing an active patient taking a serious interest in their care. Although, it’s amazing how a billionaire’s interest in their health is similar to any person with a major health issue.

July 20, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Balance of Moving Fast and Not Breaking Things

The right path forward for the digital health industry begins with a significant shift in the Silicon Valley mindset: “Move fast and break things” just won’t work. Source

That’s a powerful quote from Vic Gundotra, CEO of AliveCor. He’s right that you have to be much more careful in healthcare. That’s not always true. You can experiment on certain parts of healthcare without damaging a patient or a physician. However, you do have to be careful because it can quickly move into a regulated portion of healthcare. It’s a challenging balance.

Plus, even if you’re working in a regulated portion of healthcare we need to have more people who move fast and break things. They just need to do it within the regulations. While this is a challenge, it’s still possible. Plus, it becomes a massive competitive advantage when you do finally comply with all the regulations and provide value to the end user.

Vic offers this added insight:

What has been seen as a burden needs to be seen as a benefit. It’s time that we stop viewing regulatory bodies as obstacles and start viewing them as valuable partners.

In healthcare, entire industries are created around regulation. Regulations can be an enormous opportunity for entrepreneurs. That’s certainly a shift in mindset for many of those in silicon valley. Maybe that’s why so many big health IT companies come from places other than the valley.

July 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Promise of Wearables for Healthcare

In a recent interview I did with Dr. Rhew, Chief Medical Officer of Samsung, and Dr. Nick, CMO of Dell, we got this great insight from Dr. Rhew on the promise of wearables for healthcare (only takes 45 seconds):

It’s worth listening to the full discussion with Dr. Rhew and Dr. Nick so you have context, but I love how he framed the promise of wearables for healthcare. I especially like how he talks about these devices just being integrated into our lifestyle.

The challenge with this promise is that many of the current wearables have fallen short. They don’t integrate well with our lifestyle. They’re a pain to connect to get the data (although, that’s gotten better). The data they collect has questionable accuracy. The data they collect isn’t clinically relevant. I could keep going, but you get the idea.

While many of the wearables have fallen short, that’s a necessary part of the learning process. We’re going through a wearable revolution and that requires a product evolution. Many of the things we see as failings today will be considered laughable in the future.

Like Dr. Rhew, I think the promise of wearables is extremely exciting for healthcare. The integration of wearables into your lifestyle is happening. It’s not going to happen overnight, but each of these products will lay the groundwork for wearables that will become invisible to our day to day life.

June 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Perfect Description of Current Digital Health App Market

In this interview with Dr. John Torous, he perfectly describes the current digital health app market:

There are some useful apps currently available today that many patients would benefit from — and there are also some frightening ones that no one should ever use. Jennifer Nicholas of the Black Dog Institute in Australia published a paper looking at the quality of apps for bipolar disorder on the Apple and Android app stores. The results were not encouraging and to use the words from her paper, “the content of currently available apps for bipolar disorder is not in line with practice guidelines or established self-management principles.” She even found one app telling patients to drink hard alcohol if they had trouble falling asleep. Researchers have revealed similar findings for apps offering to help with substance abuse, suicide, anxiety, and depression.

We know there are many great apps out there, but there are a lot more unhelpful and even dangerous ones out there too.

This is exactly the problem today. Although, it’s worth noting Dr. Torous’ cautious words “would benefit from”. He didn’t say that digital health apps would cure disease, prevent mental health issues, solve health problems, or some other stronger statement. However, digital health apps could provide some benefit.

Although, he also points out that many of them shouldn’t be used at all. In fact, many of them could be doing a lot of damage. That’s a scary thought.

Most of the digital health apps I’ve seen are quite benign. They may not produce the desired results, but they also aren’t going to really harm a patient either. That’s the good thing, but it’s going to change. In order to differentiate themselves, these apps are going to have to do more. Along with that curve, we’re going to have plenty of digital health apps selling the digital health “snake oil” which has become so popular since the AMA talked about EHRs as digital “snake oil.”

Considering how most providers are approaching digital health, I’m not afraid that they’ll get hit with digital snake oil health apps. However, most of these apps are going straight to the consumer. That means that doctors have to know about the apps that do work, but also the apps their patients are using on their own. That’s going to make for an extremely hard situation for doctors. My guess is most will just set aside any apps they don’t know about as risky, but that has its own danger.

Regardless of whether a clinic wants to deal with digital health apps or not, they’re coming and your patients will be using them. It behooves every clinic to think about their digital health strategy.

June 22, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Technology is Just a Tool, It’s Not The Solution to Healthcare’s Problems

Today I’m dipping my toes in an area that’s not familiar with me. I’m attending the AHIP Institute conference in Las Vegas. For those not familiar with AHIP, it’s a coming together of the health plans across the US. This group is particularly interesting when you remember that most healthcare providers are also health plans today. In fact, we’re quickly seeing the merging of healthcare providers and payers.

The conference has just begun, but it’s already clear to me that there’s a general tone that technology is going to play a major role in the future of healthcare delivery. What also seems to clear to me is that most of these people aren’t sure what role technology will play.

The problem I think many of these people have is that they think that technology can be implemented to solve all their problems. That’s not how it works. Technology in and of itself is not a solution to most problems. Technology is just a tool. How you use that tool can be effective or not. Plus, you have to make sure that you have the right tool. If you need to drive a nail into a piece of wood, a screwdriver doesn’t do you much good.

I’d also add that even if you have the right tool, you still need the right plan. If you’re trying to build a table and you have the blueprints for a chair, then you’re not going to get the result you want. My gut tells me that most of these people are overwhelmed by the operational requirements of their day to day job and so they don’t have any time to actually explore what solutions are out there for their problems.

I agree with those at AHIP that technology shows a lot of promise. However, we need to spend a lot more time making sure we’re using the right solution at the right time in the right place. That’s a challenge we haven’t quite solved.

June 16, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.