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iOS vs Android Infographic

The iOS and Android debate is a good one that never seems to end. The good news is that the debate is really only iOS and Android now. However, the reality in my mind is that most healthcare app developers need to do both regardless.

That said, I think that this infographic illustrates some differences in the culture of the iOS ecosystem and the Android ecosystem. It’s not really surprising when you realize that there are only expensive iOS devices and so it’s no surprise that people with iOS devices have more money. Whereas there are high end Android devices and there are low end Android devices. I wonder if the numbers would be very similar between those who have high end Android devices and iOS. I bet those populations would be very similar.

What are your thoughts on the debate between iOS and Android? Does it really matter at this point?


Via: InvestmentZen.com

June 7, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When Will Digital Health Concepts Reach the Doctor?

The always insightful Joseph Kvedar, MD, has a great post up where Joe gets a wake-up call from one of his advisors:

“Joe, when are we going to take all of these digital health concepts from the 30,000 foot level and get them into that 10 minute window that the doctor has with the patient?” It is not hyperbole to say that this put the last 20+ years of my career in a whole different perspective.

This is a good wake-up call for all of us in the space. Pushing digital health solutions down to the 10 min window a doctor has with a patient is the nirvana of what we’re doing and is incredibly challenging.

Dr. Kvedar suggested that we’ve already started to do this when he shared an example of how his PCP offered an eVisit option for follow-up to his in-person visit. I think that is a good example, but his insights into the 2nd phase offered a great look into where all of this is headed [emphasis added]:

Phase two will be the integration of tools like remote monitoring of diabetes and blood pressure. This is more tricky. The front-end work of monitoring remotely-derived values is done by either a non-physician clinician or, in some cases, a software algorithm. The doctor gets involved only when there is a complex medical judgment required. When deployed at scale, this approach extends the doctor across many more patients due to the one-to-many nature of the intervention.

Taking the recent interaction with my PCP as an example, remote monitoring would be considered a whole new channel of work, which doesn’t easily fit in to his workflow like an evisit does. It is hard to estimate its value, hard to predict how much impact it will have and hard to envision how to integrate it into clinical practice.

There are some real gems in this quote. My favorite is “The doctor gets involved only when there is a complex medical judgment required.” The future of healthcare IT is going to be built on this concept. When does a doctor need to get involved and when can another staff member or software algorithm address the situation? It will take us at least a decade or more to figure out this balance. Not to mention the workflow that will make sense.

May 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Digital Health, Mobile Health, mHealth, etc Is Just Health?

Last week, the big news in the world of healthcare IT was that HIMSS acquired Health 2.0. You can check out the great writeup of the acquisition by Andy Oram. This acquisition was interesting since Health 2.0 had largely tried to be the anti-HIMSS for so long. There were others doing so as well like the mHealth Summitt and the Connected Health Conference, but those have all been acquired by HIMSS as well.

It’s no surprise that running a conference focused on startup companies doing innovative things in healthcare is a hard business. Startup companies have no money and so they can’t spend on oversized booths like the large vendors at HIMSS do. Indu and Matthew did what they could with Health 2.0, but it’s a challenging business. It will be interesting to see how things go under the HIMSS umbrella.

I know that Matthew Holt who started Health 2.0 has been beating the drum for a long time that there’s no such thing as mobile health or mHealth or Digital Health. There’s just healthcare. So, in some ways it makes sense for something like Health 2.0 to be part of a healthcare IT organization like HIMSS.

For the most part, I agree with Matthew on there not being a difference. However, I think that what this misses is that within the healthcare IT world there are companies at different stages of development. I divide these companies into 3 categories: Large Enterprise Companies, Middle Tier Companies, and Startup Companies. We could slice and dice some more, but I think this is a good framework for thinking about the industry.

Whether you liked the description of digital health or mobile health or mHealth, those terms came to represent what most people would consider startup healthcare IT companies. That’s what Health 2.0 and a few other conferences came to represent. Despite many efforts on their part to expand in other ways, HIMSS has largely come to represent the large enterprise companies. They’ve done so in a really fantastic way, but these large enterprise companies kind of suck the wind out of events like the HIMSS Annual conference.

What’s interesting to me is that the middle tier healthcare IT companies haven’t really had a place to go. Sure, they might go to HIMSS, but they generally do smaller booths and they go to show they’re a player in the space versus going to attract customers and do business deals. Same goes for Health 2.0. They might attend Health 2.0 to see what’s happening in the market, but it’s not a great event for their businesses generally either.

Along those same lines, I think that most middle tier hospitals and healthcare organizations get left out as well. They’re too small to be able to be the pilot site for a startup company and they get lost at an event like HIMSS. These middle tier healthcare organizations are interesting because they have money to spend if they can find something that works. However, they don’t have the bandwidth to be someone’s innovation center for something that might work.

No doubt, digital health is just becoming part of the overall healthcare system. However, the division between size of companies and the maturity of their products is not going to change. Not to mention the needs of the various sized healthcare organizations. It will be interesting to see what happens to Health 2.0 under HIMSS and how the market continues to evolve to better serve its stakeholders.

April 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

MindCrowd Memory Test

This week I was the moderator at the DellEMC #TranformHIT Healthcare Think Tank event. It was a great event and if you missed it, you can search the #TranformHIT on Twitter or find the recording in the embedded video at the bottom of this post.

One of the highlights of the event for me was meeting Dr. Jeff Trent From TGen, a nonprofit institute focused on translating genomic research into life-changing results. The work they’re doing is really quite incredible and Dr. Trent offered some great insights at the Think Tank.

One of the research projects at TGen is called Mind Crowd. This research looks at memory and other brain related diseases. As part of the study, they’re trying to get 1 million people to participate in a fun, but simple mind test on their site. The test takes about 10 minutes, but try it out and see how you do.

What’s fascinating about the results they’ve already seen from the 74k+ people who have taken the test to date is that women of all ages actually have better memory than men. There are outliers, but across the data it’s very clear that in this test women remember things better than men.

To add to these findings, there’s also an interesting thing that happens when women approach the age of menopause. Women at that age seem to actually get an increase in their memory. It’s not clear why this is the case, but the data shows an uptick in memory about the time most women hit menopause.

Tgen is also taking the outliers and working with them to study why their memory is so much better or worse (ie. an older person with an incredible memory or a younger person with a poor memory). I’m interested to see what comes from these studies.

If you want to contribute to their research, take 10 minutes and go and participate in their Mind Test.
Read more..

April 19, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

23andMe Gets FDA Authorization for Consumer Genetic Health Risk Reports

The big news about 23andMe’s FDA approval came out last week when I was holed up at a conference.

That’s right. 23andMe can now directly offer consumers a genetic health risk report that’s FDA approved. This is a big step for 23andMe when you consider that they’d previously gotten their hand slapped by the FDA.

23andMe got what’s called a de novo authorization from the FDA. This is something we’re likely to see more of and something that I’m sure many people aren’t familiar with. Here’s a description of what a de novo authorization is from the 23andMe announcement:

What does it mean to be granted a de novo authorization?
The Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA) added the de novo classification option, which provides an alternate pathway to classify novel devices of low to moderate risk. The de novo process is used by the FDA to grant marketing authorization for devices that are new and unlike any other on the market. In addition de novo marketing authorization means that 23andMe met the FDA’s premarket requirements to demonstrate the following: accuracy, validity and user comprehension.

I’m glad that the FDA has created this new form of authorization for companies like 23andMe. This story also stands in stark contrast to other FDA related stories like Theranos. I’m sure that 23andMe would hate the comparison. However, there are some similarities. They both got slapped by the FDA. However, their response to the FDA’s notices was completely different. That’s why 23andMe seems to still be thriving and now have FDA approval. Theranos is floundering with reports that their founder now owes the company $25 million.

Needless to say, if you’re a healthcare startup, make sure you know the FDA regulations that apply to your startup.

April 11, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

AliveCor Interview – Raises $30 Million

When I look across the mobile health ecosystem, one of the big winners is AliveCor. They’ve done an incredible job with their company and bringing their ECG readings to a much wider audience. The news recently came out that they’d raised their Series D round of investment of $30 million. As part of that announcement, my colleague Neil Versel from Meaningful Health IT News did an interview with the COO from AliveCor, Doug Biehn. You can check out the full interview below:

I hadn’t caught up with AliveCor for a while, so it was interesting to hear how much progress the company has made. Neil does a good job covering how AliveCor has been trying to figure out the balance between a consumer solution and a provider (FDA cleared) solution.

One of my favorite comments from the video above is when Neil asks about their new AlieCor platform and Doug Biehn says, “We’ve been launching new apps in the consumer space every 6 weeks for the past year, but this is our first big entree into the medical professional market.” I love this sort of iterative development in healthcare. While AliveCor does ECG, I think they’re just getting started. I’ll be interested to see what else comes out of this company as it continues to iterate and mature.

March 22, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

LEVL – Measuring Fat Burning

I’ve been sitting on this story since CES and just hadn’t had the time to write it. Plus, it dives into some deep biology and chemistry that really isn’t my wheel house, but I think the concept is too interesting not to write about it. Plus, I think this is an illustration of the larger trend I’ve been writing about which is that sensors are arriving to measure every aspect of our body.

While at CES, I had the chance to talk with LEVL. LEVL creates a device which measures the acetone level in your breathe. Here’s the science they shared with me about why the level of acetone in your breathe matters:

Previous clinical research demonstrates a correlation between the amount of acetone detected in the breath and body fat burned, giving you a reliable indicator of fat loss. LEVL is designed to detect trace amounts of acetone in your breath when your body is burning fat. LEVL Clinical Scientist, Joe Anderson Ph.D. emphasizes the significance of breath acetone measurement as it applies to the weight loss in his review, Measuring Breath Acetone for Monitoring Fat Loss in Obesity – A Research Journal.

If you want more details of how this should work, check out this video that LEVL created:

I’ll admit that the science seems interesting, but not totally definitive. Especially when it comes to actually moving the needle on people using weight. LEVL is still early in the process of figuring out how to take the data and make it actionable for the consumer. However, the concept of being able to answer the question “Are your actions helping you burn fat?” is a very interesting take that I think could be effective for many people if it’s framed the right way.

I asked the person I met from LEVL which things influenced acetone and he said “The things you’d expect” and then listed off fatty foods, sugar, no exercise, etc. Not really shocking since we have so much experiential data that knows the impact of those things on weight. That said, I could see the LEVL data being another element that at trainer or health coach could use to help motivate a patient. In fact, personal trainers are one of their big target markets to start.

It looks like LEVL is currently only available in Seattle and they are offering a LEVLhome and a LEVLpro device. The former is obviously for home use and the later is for health and wellness professionals. The product isn’t cheap. The home version is $699 and $49/mnth and the pro version is $699 + $149/month. That includes the device, app, sensor refills and calibration gas. The pro version also includes a client dashboard, training and education, and special support.

As I mentioned at the start, this is some pretty heavy science that I’ll leave to other people with more experience. However, the concept is quite interesting and I still expect we’ll see a wave of these types of devices that measure every aspect of our health.

March 9, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Fewer But Better – Connected Health at #HIMSS17

Since I go to so many connected health related conferences, seeing the latest in connected health at HIMSS is not really a huge deal. In most cases, I’ve already seen it somewhere else in a less hectic environment. With that said, I thought I’d see a real explosion of these devices at the conference. Certainly, there were many there, but I didn’t see the explosion that I had expected.

While there was a concentration of them in the Connected Health area, most of the rest of the show floor didn’t have many that I noticed. No doubt we each have our own unique experience at a 40,000 person and 1200 exhibitor conference. So, I’d be interested in hearing what other people’s experiences were at the event.

Even though I didn’t see an explosion of connected health devices (In fact, I may have seen fewer!), I do think that the devices that were being demonstrated are going a lot deeper and doing much more than previous years. That’s a good thing because these devices need to be medical relevant for the healthcare establishment to really care about them.

One example was a demo I saw at the DellEMC booth. They had an incredible dashboard of data that was pulling in a number of different health devices. One tracking pill that you swallow was particularly intriguing. The pill showed that the guy demoing the software had been pretty stressed that morning when the demo wasn’t working quite right. Luckily when I was there he was doing better.

Another feature of these connected health devices that hit me was how far they could reach. At the same demo with DellEMC, they had devices that could be tracked for nearly the entire HIMSS Exhibit hall (All of the Orlando Convention Center). While that’s not needed for home applications where wifi is basically ubiquitous, this is a very valuable tool to connect devices in a hospital setting.

As I mentioned, I hadn’t seen many new things, but we’re seeing the natural evolution of these connected health devices. They haven’t really broken out at HIMSS, but they are definitely getting more mature and that’s a good thing.

March 3, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Connected Health at #HIMSS17

One of the big growth areas at the HIMSS Annual Conference has been around digital and personal connected health (Formerly called mHealth or Mobile Health or Digital Health, etc). At HIMSS 2017 we see that trend continue. If you’re interested in connected health, then you’ll be busy at HIMSS this year.

To start off, they have an entire specialty education summit on the Sunday before the regular conference and the Monday of the conference that’s focused on Digital and Personal Connected Health (Costs $545 to attend now). You can find more details on this event and other education, exhibition and networking around Connected Health here. This Connected Health social hour looks pretty interesting.

Along with the Connected Health Summit, HIMSS Attendees can browse through a wide variety of Connected Health sessions on the education schedule and programming at the Connected Health Experience in the exhibit area.

If you’re looking for exhibitors working on Connected Health solutions, you can check out this list of HIMSS 2017 exhibitors. No doubt there are other exhibitors at HIMSS that just didn’t classify themselves that way, but they’re working on Connected Health solutions.

Along with the Connected Health sessions and exhibits, they also have a Wellness Challenge for all HIMSS attendees. If you’ve ever wanted a Free Apple Watch, then you might want to participate. I always love the idea personally but wish that the competition was virtual. I can never make it at the time specified.

Finally, if you’re not going to be at HIMSS or if you’re there and you want to share in the Connected Health conversation, there’s a special #Connect2Health hashtag you can follow and use.

I know in the past the Connected Health vendors have been some of the more interesting and innovative companies at HIMSS. I’ll be sure to report back on any that I find.

February 17, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Alexa, Can You Heal Me Now? The Power of Voice Assistant Technology in Healthcare

On Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 1:00 PM ET (10:00 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with Nathan Treloar, President and COO at Orbita. In our discussion, we’ll be diving into voice assistant technology in healthcare including the breakout hit from Amazon known as Alexa. This has so much potential in healthcare. Join us as we talk about Alexa and other voice assistant technologies in healthcare and how more organizations can leverage voice assistant technology in their product offerings.

The great part is that you can join my conversation live and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask your own questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 1:00 PM ET (10:00 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of this post or you can watch on YouTube directly. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

About Nathan Treloar
Nate Treloar is co-founder and president of Orbita, which provides the first secure (HIPAA-compliant) cloud-based platform for creating and managing digital home healthcare applications. Previously, he held key executive positions at FAST Search, Microsoft, RAMP, and, Ektron. He is a respected expert and speaker on consumer IoT trends, search, text and data mining, content management, and knowledge management and has advised hundreds of the world’s largest companies and government agencies on their applications.

We hope you’ll join us live using the video below or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation.


(To Ask Questions, visit the YouTube page)

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

January 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.