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AliveCor Interview – Raises $30 Million

When I look across the mobile health ecosystem, one of the big winners is AliveCor. They’ve done an incredible job with their company and bringing their ECG readings to a much wider audience. The news recently came out that they’d raised their Series D round of investment of $30 million. As part of that announcement, my colleague Neil Versel from Meaningful Health IT News did an interview with the COO from AliveCor, Doug Biehn. You can check out the full interview below:

I hadn’t caught up with AliveCor for a while, so it was interesting to hear how much progress the company has made. Neil does a good job covering how AliveCor has been trying to figure out the balance between a consumer solution and a provider (FDA cleared) solution.

One of my favorite comments from the video above is when Neil asks about their new AlieCor platform and Doug Biehn says, “We’ve been launching new apps in the consumer space every 6 weeks for the past year, but this is our first big entree into the medical professional market.” I love this sort of iterative development in healthcare. While AliveCor does ECG, I think they’re just getting started. I’ll be interested to see what else comes out of this company as it continues to iterate and mature.

March 22, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

LEVL – Measuring Fat Burning

I’ve been sitting on this story since CES and just hadn’t had the time to write it. Plus, it dives into some deep biology and chemistry that really isn’t my wheel house, but I think the concept is too interesting not to write about it. Plus, I think this is an illustration of the larger trend I’ve been writing about which is that sensors are arriving to measure every aspect of our body.

While at CES, I had the chance to talk with LEVL. LEVL creates a device which measures the acetone level in your breathe. Here’s the science they shared with me about why the level of acetone in your breathe matters:

Previous clinical research demonstrates a correlation between the amount of acetone detected in the breath and body fat burned, giving you a reliable indicator of fat loss. LEVL is designed to detect trace amounts of acetone in your breath when your body is burning fat. LEVL Clinical Scientist, Joe Anderson Ph.D. emphasizes the significance of breath acetone measurement as it applies to the weight loss in his review, Measuring Breath Acetone for Monitoring Fat Loss in Obesity – A Research Journal.

If you want more details of how this should work, check out this video that LEVL created:

I’ll admit that the science seems interesting, but not totally definitive. Especially when it comes to actually moving the needle on people using weight. LEVL is still early in the process of figuring out how to take the data and make it actionable for the consumer. However, the concept of being able to answer the question “Are your actions helping you burn fat?” is a very interesting take that I think could be effective for many people if it’s framed the right way.

I asked the person I met from LEVL which things influenced acetone and he said “The things you’d expect” and then listed off fatty foods, sugar, no exercise, etc. Not really shocking since we have so much experiential data that knows the impact of those things on weight. That said, I could see the LEVL data being another element that at trainer or health coach could use to help motivate a patient. In fact, personal trainers are one of their big target markets to start.

It looks like LEVL is currently only available in Seattle and they are offering a LEVLhome and a LEVLpro device. The former is obviously for home use and the later is for health and wellness professionals. The product isn’t cheap. The home version is $699 and $49/mnth and the pro version is $699 + $149/month. That includes the device, app, sensor refills and calibration gas. The pro version also includes a client dashboard, training and education, and special support.

As I mentioned at the start, this is some pretty heavy science that I’ll leave to other people with more experience. However, the concept is quite interesting and I still expect we’ll see a wave of these types of devices that measure every aspect of our health.

March 9, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Fewer But Better – Connected Health at #HIMSS17

Since I go to so many connected health related conferences, seeing the latest in connected health at HIMSS is not really a huge deal. In most cases, I’ve already seen it somewhere else in a less hectic environment. With that said, I thought I’d see a real explosion of these devices at the conference. Certainly, there were many there, but I didn’t see the explosion that I had expected.

While there was a concentration of them in the Connected Health area, most of the rest of the show floor didn’t have many that I noticed. No doubt we each have our own unique experience at a 40,000 person and 1200 exhibitor conference. So, I’d be interested in hearing what other people’s experiences were at the event.

Even though I didn’t see an explosion of connected health devices (In fact, I may have seen fewer!), I do think that the devices that were being demonstrated are going a lot deeper and doing much more than previous years. That’s a good thing because these devices need to be medical relevant for the healthcare establishment to really care about them.

One example was a demo I saw at the DellEMC booth. They had an incredible dashboard of data that was pulling in a number of different health devices. One tracking pill that you swallow was particularly intriguing. The pill showed that the guy demoing the software had been pretty stressed that morning when the demo wasn’t working quite right. Luckily when I was there he was doing better.

Another feature of these connected health devices that hit me was how far they could reach. At the same demo with DellEMC, they had devices that could be tracked for nearly the entire HIMSS Exhibit hall (All of the Orlando Convention Center). While that’s not needed for home applications where wifi is basically ubiquitous, this is a very valuable tool to connect devices in a hospital setting.

As I mentioned, I hadn’t seen many new things, but we’re seeing the natural evolution of these connected health devices. They haven’t really broken out at HIMSS, but they are definitely getting more mature and that’s a good thing.

March 3, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Noninvasive 3D Heart Mapping System

Last week, Medtronic got FDA approval for their CardioInsight™ Mapping Vest.

I’ll admit that many of the technical details of the CardioInsight product are well above my health knowledge, but those that are interested should go and read Heather Mack’s article on mobihealthnews to get more detail.

What I do get is that this new FDA cleared device can create a 3D map of your heart using 252 electrode sensors and doesn’t require a doctor to insert a catheter to get a cardiac map of the heart. That’s pretty impressive technology and it’s great that it’s already been FDA cleared.

While I can see how this will be extremely valuable when identifying the origin of arrhythmias, I’m interested to see what other data this device will be able to collect and the insights that will come from that data. I also love that this non-invasive approach is much better for the patient on a number of levels including not having to have to spend time and be stressed over an invasive clinical procedure.

For a while, I’ve suggested that we’re still in the very early days of health sensors. This heart mapping vest seems to be a nice step forward in that progression. I can’t see us wearing one of these in our homes, but we may be able to use it discover what insights matter and develop consumer-based sensors that you would use in the home.

What will they think of next? Actually, that’s the most exciting part of working in digital health.

February 9, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Is the New Clinic, Forward, Only Reasonable for the Silicon Valley Elite?

A new clinic has been opened in San Francisco called Forward which is an attempt to reinvent the doctor’s office by several dozen former employees of Google, Facebook, Uber, and Palantir. On the one hand, this new clinic is an amalgamation of all the innovation that’s been happening in the digital health space. On the other hand, it seems to illustrate Silicon Valley excess and culture. Let’s take a look at each perspective.

Forward starts the patient experience with an iPad sign in that’s setup looks a lot like the Apple Store. It sounds like they’ve built all new software for their clinic, but tablet check in or other kiosk check in options have been in healthcare for quite a while. After checking in on the iPad, the patient then goes to a body scanner that identifies you using 2 fingers and then gathers your height, weight, body temperature, heart rate and the amount of oxygen in your blood. All of this data is available to doctors today, but this is a novel way to collect the data that likely saves time for patients and the clinic staff.

The exam rooms look like a really well designed exam room, but still feel like an exam room you might go to in most doctor’s offices. However, one notable feature of the exam room is a massive touch-screen display on the wall.

What makes the exam room and this touch screen unique is that the exam room listens to what’s being said in the room and pulls out information for the medical record and displays that information on the screen in real time. This sounds a lot like what I described in my Video EHR idea. The screen will also show the patient’s health history including sensor data and suggests diagnoses and treatment plans. How well it does at this is a good question, but in true Silicon Valley fashion I’m sure it’s an MVP (Minimum Viable Product) that will improve over time.

Many are touting Forward’s unique approach to Urine Sample collection, but this has been done in many other offices for years. Is this really an issue? I don’t think so. Forward also has essentially a health store as well that sells everything from wearable sensors to vitamins and supplements to skin care products. This has a kind of Apple Store feel as well. This can be a great revenue stream for clinics. Eventually you can imagine all of these items being ordered at the doctor’s office and delivered to your house or office by drone. Until then, UPS/FedEx/USPS will have to do.

As you can imagine, all of the biometric data that’s collected at check in, lab results, etc syncs up with a mobile app that the patient can use to access their health data. Looks like they have plans for genomic data as well. Forward has also committed to responding to messages from it’s members (yes, they call you members, not patients) within 1 minute day or night. I wonder if that response is a real human or an AI bot.

As I mentioned, this feels like an amalgamation of everything that’s been happening with digital health. If you’ve followed the digital health space, then you’ve seen almost all of these things done individually somewhere already. This isn’t necessarily a knock on Forward. The iPhone largely was an incorporation of a bunch of innovations that were available elsewhere. However, Apple packaged it nicely into an extremely usable package. Is that what Forward’s done here? I personally think that’s overstating things since they haven’t completely transformed the model (yet?), but it has made a high end medical office experience.

That leads to my second observation about Forward. In many ways, Forward just looks like Silicon Valley excess in the same vein as the over engineered $1500 Smart Oven. How many of the things mentioned above actually improve your care or inspire you to be healthier and how many of them are just for show?

I guess you could make the case that the whole package makes for a better experience that makes you want to go to the doctor, but that’s butting up against a massive desire we all have of not going to the doctor that’s been built into our DNA for years. Plus, the package doesn’t seem like it’s reached the nirvana of treating healthy patients, but instead is just a high end doctor visit experience.

I’m not suggesting that there’s anything wrong with creating a high end doctor visit experience. That very well could work in wealthy areas like Silicon Valley and other areas of the country like New York and LA. That very well could be a good business (although, my guess is they raised too much money for that to be their only business), but it’s not going to transform healthcare as we know it. I don’t see how Forward scales down to the lower end of the market. They should go and talk with ZDoggMD about his experience with Turntable Health which he just had to shut down. They could learn a lot from his experiences.

I’m not saying that no good will come from the Forward experience. It’s quite possible that the Forward clinic is used as an incubation lab for new ideas which the company can then commercialize and sell to the rest of the medical world at a reasonable price. Their excess could produce learnings that could benefit the rest of healthcare if they package it the right way and don’t just try to build a new health care system themselves. That would be an incredible outcome for healthcare.

I know every doctor would rejoice at the idea of a smart patient wall that listened to their interaction with the patient and did the proper documentation for them. That’s the face to face interaction for which doctors and patients now yearn. The big challenge here is that Forward doesn’t have to worry about things like insurance reimbursement, meaningful use, and MACRA. So, will their technology apply to the rest of healthcare? Or does it just enable the high end unlimited primary care model that they’re executing today?

Also, Forward is only working on primary care, wellness, and men’s and women’s health. That still leaves specialists in the regular insurance controlled world (Yes, you still need insurance and the $149/month membership to Forward). Can high quality primary care change healthcare? I think it could, but it’s going to take a shift in mindset (payers, employers, patients, doctors) by many for it to happen.

I know another medical practice in San Francisco that built their practice on the back of cash patients who got a great, fast customer experience. Employers in San Francisco were happy to pay cash for the visit because they knew their employee would be off work at the doctor’s office for less time then traditional healthcare paid for largely by insurance. The cash cost of a visit was much less than having that employee away from work. San Francisco is a unique culture and so that worked for this medical practice and Forward could work in San Francisco as well. I just don’t see the path for them to scale the clinic model across the country. I hope they don’t try, but instead focus on spreading their innovations across the country. If all that fails, at least the Silicon Valley elite now have an opportunity to network with other Silicon Valley elite at the doctor’s office.

January 19, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Is Going to Benefit from the Confluence of Consumer Technologies

Next week is the annual CES conference in Las Vegas. It’s a unique event that brings together 170,000 people across 4 of the largest conference venues in the world. It’s enormous and a little hard to process.

Having attended for the last ~11 years, it’s been amazing to see the pace of progress with so many technologies. Remember that it’s only been about 9 years since the iPhone was launched. While smartphones and tablets have gotten so much better over this time period a whole slew of other consumer technologies have as well.

Looking forward to CES, it’s amazing to see the development of things like: 3D Printing, Virtual Reality, Augmented reality, IoT (Internet of Things…or as I like to call it Smart Everything), voice recognition, AI, robotics, sensors, etc etc etc. It’s an exciting time to be in an industry where so many things are developing so quickly.

Maybe I’m skewed because I’m a blogger in healthcare, but it’s really amazing how healthcare sits at the confluence of so many of these technologies. The overlap that’s going to happen between augmented reality, 3D printing, AI, sensors and new things we barely understand is going to be extraordinary.

I recently saw a 3D printing conference for healthcare. While 3D printing is very exciting for healthcare, it wouldn’t be nearly as exciting if we didn’t have all of the other innovations in cameras, storage, data sharing, virtual reality, etc. We needed evolutions and innovations in all of these spaces for the other technologies to really work well.

I’ve often said that the most interesting things in healthcare happen at the intersections. I think that’s particularly true in the digital health space. As I head to CES, I’ll be watching for this type of crossover of technologies. I think this year we’re going to see a lot of companies utilizing multiple technologies in ways we’d never seen previously.

December 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Scanadu to Shut Down Scout Medical Device Per FDA Regulation

The famous Qualcomm Tricorder prize winner and IndieGogo crowdfunding success, Scanadu, has just hit some major bumps in the road. In fact, you might say they lost their engine completely. After winning the X Prize foundation’s tricorder competition, they went on to raise more than $1.6 million on IndieGogo from 8509 backers.

After shipping the product, Techcrunch just broke the news that Scanadu was now planning to disable the Scout’s functionality. Yes, that’s right. People paid $149-269 for the Scanadu Scout and now Scanadu is going to brick all of the devices. Here’s their official comment to Techcrunch:

“From the beginning of the campaign, this was an investigational device that was part of a study which has now reached its endpoint with data collection for the study ending in November 2016. FDA regulations require that all investigational studies be brought to closure and their respective devices be deactivated. As a result, we will deactivate the Scanadu Scout® devices by May 15, 2017.

Interestingly, the Scanadu website, Twitter, Facebook, etc are all quiet. In fact, most of them have been quiet since April. What hasn’t been quiet is customers anger towards Scanadu. That’s true on social media, but also in the IndieGogo comment section where Scanadu had raised $1.6 million.

You can imagine people’s anger. Their expensive device will now be useless. As one commenter pointed out, someone bought 100 of them. That person will now essentially have 100 expensive bricks. In the comments, people are calling for a class action lawsuit, refunds from IndieGogo and outrage at the company doing this to them. The most salient point is that it’s hard to imagine anyone ever buying a product from Scanadu again after something like this occurs. One commenter suggested the following:

The consent doc also says: “If you have any questions about your rights, call the Scripps Office for the Protection of Research Subjects at (858) 652-5500. ” [Note: Scripps is performing the study based on the Scanadu data.]

Some people in the comments are even commenting that there’s no such FDA regulation. I’m not an expert on FDA regulation, but my gut tells me there’s more to this story than we know today. I could easily see how there could be an FDA regulation that required a company to shut down devices that made claims they couldn’t achieve and therefore put people’s health in danger. I’m not sure if this is what’s happening with Scanadu, but when there’s smoke there’s usually fire.

I think we all loved the romanticized idea of a medical tricorder. Haven’t we all wanted one since we first saw it portrayed on Star Trek? Scanadu was trying to make it a reality, but it seems their efforts have fallen flat. This is a good warning to everyone else out there. FDA compliance is no joke. Even winning an X Prize, a successful crowd funding campaign, and raising $35 million in funding doesn’t guarantee success.

Innovation in healthcare is hard!

December 14, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Expanding World of Health Sensors

It’s been fascinating to watch the number of health sensors blow up over the years. The sad part of the last 3-5 years has been that a huge majority of the sensors that were hitting the market were essentially me too products. How many fitness trackers, blood pressure cuffs, smart scales, heart rate monitors, etc do we need. No doubt each of these products has produced some successful businesses, but have they really moved the needle on healthcare? My answer is no and that’s because these health sensors aren’t very clinically relevant.

The good thing is that I’ve started to see a wider variety of sensors that measure everything imaginable on your body. None of these have been breakout hits yet, but that’s largely because they’re trying to really measure something that’s clinically relevant versus creating a consumer toy.

There are a lot of ways to look at the health sensor market, but one way is to look at which part of the body they’re using to measure some health indicator. Here’s a list of some of the sensors I’ve seen over the past couple years (starting with the obvious ones):

  • Skin
  • Motion
  • Sweat
  • Blood
  • Eye
  • Visual
  • Brainwaves
  • Stool
  • Blood Flow
  • Spit

As you can see, there are companies working on measuring every output we produce in order to try and understand our health.  Some of these we’ve been doing forever like blood tests.  Labs are such an important part of healthcare.  However, what’s different about the latest generation of health sensors is that most of these health sensors are going direct to consumers as opposed to selling to the healthcare providers.

Think about that shift. That’s a massive change. Plus, the ironic part is that many healthcare providers are adopting and using consumer sensors in their healthcare organizations. I’m also interested in how this shift in information is going to change the balance of power in healthcare. Information is power.

Are there other sensors out there that you see coming to market? Which ones do you think will be most clinically relevant?

December 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

What If We Looked at the Smartphone Camera as a “Sensor” Instead of a “Digital Camera”

Benedict Evans is one of the smartest people I’ve read on treads happening in the technology industry. It’s been fascinating to read his perspectives on the shift to mobile and how mobile adoption has changed society. Back in August he blew my mind again as we think of the evolution of mobile and redefining how we use the camera on our smartphones and what it means for mobile applications. Here’s an excerpt from that post:

This change in assumptions applies to the sensor itself as much as to the image: rather than thinking of a ‘digital camera, I’d suggest that one should think about the image sensor as an input method, just like the multi-touch screen. That points not just to new types of content but new interaction models. You started with a touch screen and you can use that for an on-screen keyboard and for interaction models that replicate a mouse model, tapping instead of clicking. But next, you can make the keyboard smarter, or have GIFs instead of letters, and you can swipe and pinch. You go beyond virtualising the input models of an older set of hardware on the new sensor, and move to new input models. The same is true of the image sensor. We started with a camera that takes photos, and built, say, filters or a simple social network onto that, and that can be powerful. We can even take video too. But what if you use the screen itself as the camera – not a viewfinder, but the camera itself? The input can be anything that the sensors can capture, and can be processed in any way that you can write the software.

Everyone has long argued that the smartphone is great as a consumption engine, but it’s not great as a content creation engine. That’s largely true today, but will that change in the future? I think it’s an extremely powerful idea to think of the camera on your smartphone as a sensor that captures meaningful actions beyond just capturing a picture. That’s a powerful concept that is going to change the way mobile apps work and how they’re designed.

The same is true when you think about the camera app software on your smartphone. We see that with Snapchat and other apps that have taken what’s essentially a camera app and overlayed filters to add new functionality to an otherwise simple item.

Now think about this from a healthcare perspective. Could the camera on your smartphone be a window into your health? Could what you capture with the camera show a window into your daily activities? That brings health tracking to a whole new level.

I first saw an example of this at a Connected Health Symposium many years ago when I saw someone researching how your cell phone camera could measure your heart rate. I’m not sure all the technical details, but I guess the way you look subtley changes and you can measure that change and thus measure your heart rate. Pretty amazing stuff, but that definitely sounds like using your camera as a sensor as opposed to a digital camera.

Go and read Benedict Evan’s full article to really understand this change. I think it could have incredible implications for digital health applications.

November 16, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Speed of Innovation in Mobile Networks – Enabling The Future of Healthcare

I’ve been attending the CTIA Super Mobility Conference in Las Vegas today and it’s been eye opening to say the least. The efforts they’re making to make wireless networks work for the IOT (internet of things) and even things like drones is incredible. Much of the buzz at the event has also been around the coming 5G networks.

Matt Grop EVP and CTO at Qualcomm offered this comparison of the progression from voice to 4G LTE to 5G:

Later, Rajeev Suir, President and CEO of Nokia, then suggested that we need 5G networks because the applications of the future will require it. This is an interesting statement to consider. Today during my Healthcare API discussion the need for faster connections came up and illustrated how healthcare could benefit from this additional speed. In fact, the innovations in healthcare are likely going to be facilitated or even demand the faster speeds to become a reality.

Think about neural networks and genomic medicine. That type of processing isn’t going to happen on the phone. The data for those won’t be stored on your phone, laptop, or desktop. It’s going to be stored and processed in the cloud and then sent back to your phone. The exchange of data that is going to need to happen is going to be huge and we’re going to need really fast networks to enable this future.

Think about all of the sensor data that is going to be reporting up to the cloud to be processed by these neural networks and pharmacogenomic processing engines. We’re not going to plug in to transfer this data. It’s going to use these ubiquitous wireless networks that currently connect our smart phones.

This all certainly leads to a fascinating future. I love the way technology can open the door to opportunities that would have never been thought possible previously. New high speed mobile networks like 5G are an example of that. The only question is if even 5G will be fast enough.

September 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.