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Techstars++ Joins Forces with Mayo Clinic

For those not familiar with Techstars, they are one of the best startup accelerators out there today. You can literally look at the statistics for the startups they’ve invested in on the TechStars stats page. For those not familiar with the startup accelerator model, companies get a small sum of money (usually enough to live for 3 months) and spend 3 months in a city with other startup companies building out your startup company. It’s turned out to be a great model with Ycombinator and Techstars leading the pack and plenty of healthcare startup accelerators following after.

Many of the Techstars companies have been healthcare startups (especially the Techstars Boston classes) and Techstars has just created a new partnership with the Mayo Clinic to help these startup companies even more. It’s called Techstars++ and is launching with the Mayo Clinic. Here’s a description from the announcement:

Techstars++ offers companies from across the Techstars network the opportunity to extend their Techstars experience by spending time on site and engaging deeply with a relevant corporate partner. For example, after completing Techstars, healthcare-oriented companies can spend two weeks at the Mayo Clinic exploring business development opportunities and other synergies. A full time Techstars Program Director will reside on-site and work closely with the startups and the corporation to help maximize the opportunity. There is no charge to Techstars companies to participate in Techstars++.

In the past, I’ve wondered if general tech accelerators like Techstars were the right approach for healthcare startup companies. There’s so much that’s different in healthcare that you need to make sure you have someone who understand the healthcare culture. I still think this is a major challenge for a healthcare startup in Techstars, but this 2 week residency at Mayo Clinic is a good step towards opening customer doors for healthcare startups in these programs. They should then expand the program to include a medium and small size hospital as well. Having those three categories of hospitals on board is incredibly important when launching a health IT company to the hospital world.

December 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Interesting Tweets from #mHealth14

As noted, I didn’t make it to mHealth Summit 2014, but I have been watching on the #mHealth14 Twitter stream. The Twitter stream is not a substitute for in person connections you can make, but it is a substitute for the in person learning.

Here’s a look at a few of the tweets I’ve seen and some personal commentary on each:


The global position of mHealth Summit is worth considering. In some ways that makes the conference less attractive to many US healthcare providers. However, it also could be a wonderful international exchange of ideas.


Major props to the HIMSS social media team. They’ve been killing it with really professionally done vignettes like this one. If Harry means “healthcare system” as an individual healthcare organization, then I agree. If he means the US healthcare system, then I’m not sure I agree. It’s not like we’re going to stop getting healthcare. All of that said, a reminder of the importance of the patient is always good.


This is a common doctor perspective. The responses to the tweet were interesting though. Here’s one that really stood out:


Obviously there is a balance to both things. We haven’t found that balance yet.


This is a common topic at mHealth Summit conferences. I think the answer is yes, but it likely won’t come from the existing healthcare institutions.


Just remember that barriers are a double edged sword. On the one hand they make it hard to implement. On the other hand, it makes it harder for your competitors to copy you once you’ve figured it out. So, take the good with the bad.


Dan’s been talking about this subject for a while. I expect it will be his favorite slide in 2015 too. I’m looking forward to seeing the solutions he puts forward.


Two of my favorite healthcare IT thinkers. These are both extraordinary women. Read their stuff and you’ll see why I like them so much.


Kindness is underestimated because it’s impossible to measure. Starts to make you wonder about what mHealth apps will be most effective.


Barbara totally nailed it. An mHealth app that does this well will be extremely successful.

December 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Who’s Going to the mHealth Summit?

I’ve attended the mHealth Summit the past 3-4 years (sorry I lose track). I’ve always enjoyed the experience since I have a lot of friends and colleagues in Washington DC. However, the conference has always been a bit underwhelming for me. This year I didn’t have any other work or friend related things happening in DC and so I won’t be making the long trek to the frigid DC area for the mHealth Summit this year. I’ll admit that I’ve had a busy Fall conference season as well, and so that adds to the desire to not travel.

However, I’m hearing that a lot of people aren’t going to the mHealth Summit 2015. I’ll be interested to hear the final attendee and exhibitor numbers when they come out and see how they compare to past years. Maybe the people I’ve talked to are just an aberration. I’ll admit that as I’ve seen some of the tweets I’ve wondered if I should be there (FOMO at play?). Although, when I think of leaving my wife and kids again, the jealousy mostly departs.

The great part is that I can still watch the mHealth Summit twitter stream (#mhs14 I believe) and get a feel for what’s happening at the conference. I’m sure I’ll see many of the most interesting companies at CES a few weeks later. At least that’s what happened last year. There wasn’t much new to talk about when you see a company at two shows within a month of each other.

I’ll also be interested to see if mHealth Summit can really crack into the general healthcare market. I think this was at least part of the goal when HIMSS took it over. Could HIMSS bring the more traditional healthcare people into the mHealth space?

I’ve heard many people argue that mHealth will eventually just become a standard part of health IT. I agree with this idea. Makes me wonder when mHealth will be a section of HIMSS as opposed to its own conference.

December 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The mHealth Tipping Point – See Angry Birds?

In a recent #HITsm chat, someone suggested that the mHealth Tipping point would be when mHealth was as addicting as Angry Birds (sorry I can’t find the tweet to give specific credit to the person). I thought about the idea. No doubt, it would be great if mHealth apps were as addicting as Angry Birds or other mobile games like it. However, I don’t think we want mHealth apps to follow a similar adoption curve to Angry Birds. In fact, I think that mHealth apps today are very much like the Angry Birds adoption curve. Here’s my response to the Angry Birds comparison.

The problem with Angry Birds is that someone uses it religiously for a while and then they kind of burn out and stop playing the game. Does that sound like mHealth apps today?

This is why I hope that mHealth apps are more like text messaging app than an Angry Birds app. A text messaging app is something you rely on and use every day. It’s something that provides ongoing value to you and so you never stop using it. It becomes an indispensable part of how you spend your day.

Plus, how many of us think about our text messaging app? You don’t download it. You don’t think, “Oh, I need to use that app.” No, you just use it all the time and other people interact with you through it as well. This is the model that the most successful mHealth apps will have to follow.

November 26, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Google’s Efforts in Healthcare

I thought it would be interesting to take a quick look at what Google is currently doing in healthcare. While Google Health was shut down a long time ago, Google still has an amazing interesting in health and healthcare. Actually, I’m not sure how much Google cares about healthcare, but the Google Founders do seem to care. I call it the Tech Geeks Got Old Effect (ie. They get old and have money they need to spend. So, they spend the money to try and prolong their life.)

By far, the biggest project that Google has announced in healthcare is Calico. They even have a website for the project. However, the website really doesn’t say much. Luckily, the wikipedia page offers a bit more info:

Calico is an independent R&D biotech company established in 2013 by Google Inc. whose goal is to tackle the process of aging. More specifically, Calico’s plan is to use advanced technology to increase understanding of the biology that controls lifespan, and to use that knowledge to increase longevity. The company is led by founder & CEO Arthur D. Levinson, who is the current chairman of Apple Inc. as well as the former chairman of Genentech and was on the board of directors of Hoffmann-La Roche. The name Calico is shorthand for California Life Company. Arthur Levinson had posted he and four others were principal in Calico on Google+. Those four people mentioned were: Robert Cohen, Hal V. Barron, David Botstein and Cynthia Kenyon. Three of the four named are or were previously affiliated with Genentech.

In Google’s 2013 Founders’ Letter, Larry Page described Calico as a company focused on “health, wellbeing and longevity.”

The thing I like most about Calico is that it seems like they understand the need to mix scientists, programmers, medically trained personnel, and more in order to solve many of the really challenging problems we face in healthcare. We’d love to think that one programmer in a garage at a computer could solve things, but my guess is that the next big change in healthcare will come from a scientist, programmer, data scientist and medical professional in a garage. I guess Calico doesn’t have the garage, but I like the cross disciplinary approach to the problems.

I’m hopeful they’re successful in their mission since I’m getting old as well. I think their goals are quite ambitious and so I think they’ll likely fail in the stated goals, but still do some amazing good along the way. That’s fine. I have a feeling that’s why Calico’s goals are so ambitious.

The other major project that Google’s doing in the healthcare space is Google Fit. I was and am still skeptical of Apple Health and it’s possible impact on healthcare. I’d say the same things about Google Fit. I’m not suggesting that either will be a massive flop. I think they’ll gain some traction and provide some benefit to a few people. However, I don’t see Google Fit as the transformative platform that Google and Apple want their solutions to be. Healthcare is much more complex than they realize and I don’t think either company wants to dive deep enough into healthcare to really make a massive change in how we view healthcare.

The #1 Google product for healthcare is actually something we probably take for granted. That’s the Google search results themselves. I know my wife has turned to Dr. Google plenty of times when her, my children or myself come down with something. Is this right or wrong? It doesn’t really matter. It’s just the reality. The quality of Google’s health search results could have as big of an impact on healthcare as almost any other healthcare company. That’s a really big deal and something that Google probably doesn’t even realize.

November 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Unbound Conference in San Diego

The Healthcare Unbound Conference in sunny San Diego, CA is just around the corner on December 3-4, 2014. Here’s a little bit more about the conference:

This conference builds on the strength of our ten previous Healthcare Unbound events. The Healthcare Unbound Conference offers timely and practical information as well as visionary perspectives. Over the years the conference has attracted hundreds of high-level executives and clinicians from across the US and abroad.

Plus, here are some of the topics they’ll be covering at the conference:

  • The evolving role of Patient Digital Health Platforms and wearable technologies and the implications for healthcare stakeholders and technology companies.
  • Examples of how technologies to promote patient engagement have been used effectively in post-discharge monitoring, chronic disease management and mental health to improve outcomes and reduce costs.
  • Opportunities and challenges in creating linkages between electronic health records and consumer-facing technologies such as remote monitoring, social media, wearables and mHealth applications.
  • How to aggregate and analyze patient generated health data so that it’s most useful to patients, providers and payers. How to convert data into knowledge and make it available at the point of care.
  • Strategies and methodologies for showing the clinical effectiveness and cost savings associated with digital health products.
  • Key considerations in designing products to engage health consumers.
  • Privacy and security considerations.
  • Reimbursement and regulatory considerations.
  • Emerging business models and strategies for collaboration for technology companies. Financier perspectives.

If you’re working in the mobile health or mHealth space, you’ll want to take a look at what they’re doing. In their 11th year, the Healthcare Unbound conference has a great perspective on what’s happening. Register now for early bird pricing to the event.

November 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Sometimes the Best Fitness Solutions are Low Tech Tech Hacks

Simple Low Tech Fitness Solution

I got this image from Sarah Bennight (@sarahbennight). I love her simple motivation methodology using her phone’s built in alarm system. Sometimes we try and make mobile health too complicated. Simple, but effective will probably work out better.

October 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Online Diagnosis and Treatment App – Zipnosis

I was recently introduced to an online diagnosis and treatment app called Zipnosis. The video embedded below does a pretty good job describing how the app works and what they’re trying to do with the company.

In some ways, this technology reminds me of Vinod Khosla’s famous quote that “technology will replace 80 percent of doctors.” In the case of Zipnosis, it seems that the technology isn’t quite replacing the doctor, but it’s one step closer to being able to do so. They told me that’s not their vision, but you can see how this could be the start of a very interesting algorithm that could treat patients.

I’m sure many people reading this are wondering how a doctor can treat someone who they’ve never talked to, met, touched, etc. In fact, it seems that with Zipnosis the doctors is treating and prescribing for a patient who has just filled out what amounts to an online form (in the form of an online app). Lest you get too concerned, here’s the list of conditions they treat:
Zipnosis Online Diagnosis Treatment Options

I’ll be interested to see how this list expands and contracts. No doubt, there are a lot of situations where an online form is probably more than enough to treat the patient. Add in pictures and you have a bunch more things you can treat. Add in other external devices and you can treat even more. I’ll be interested to watch Zipnosis and see how they expand and how the market responds to what they’re offering.

October 22, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Creating mHealth Apps That Do Something for You

There was a great LinkedIn discussion happening around the Fitness Tracker Fallout post that I did previously. One of the comments by Dean Tucker, Founder & CEO at MyNightCare, LLC, provided some really interesting insights into the mHealth app market:

The focus of the current crop of devices and apps requires one to “do” something, engage in a social competition, analyze our own data, and follow advice from someone or something we don’t know or trust.

The secret to successful apps and their utilization will be revealed when the apps and tracking devices the apps rely upon provide the answer to the question, “what does this do for me”, rather than telling me, “here is what you need to do.” What I want is the ability is to have a life monitoring ecosystem, with the sensors and devices we already have in our lives, complemented by new passive sensors, and the active tracking devices we choose to use, when we want or need them. That is where Apple, Google, Samsung, and all of other aggregators, will play the lead role. The supporting specialty apps will be there for when I want to drill down, or focus on a particular activity or health related issue.

What a powerful concept to consider. Most apps could really benefit from thinking about what the mHealth app can do for the user as opposed to what the user needs to do for the app. That’s not to say that the user shouldn’t have any involvement in doing something with the app. However, it takes a very specific situation and motivation for a user to be willing to do the work before receiving the reward.

Dean is right that we’ll see an amazing shift in fitness tracking once the devices collect the data automatically with no intervention from the user. We’re heading that direction and those that master that kind of health tracking are going to be the big winners.

October 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Cerner Wellness Integrates with Apple’s HealthKit

When Apple announced HealthKit, they announced a few healthcare partners including Epic. Many thought this was an interesting announcement, but I was (and still am) skeptical that anything really meaningful will come. As one person put it, we’re suppose to be excited that two of the most closed companies in the world are working together?

I recently saw the news come out that Epic’s main competitor, Cerner, announced that they’d integrated with Apple’s HealthKit. In fact, I believe their integration seems to have come out before Epic’s integration (unless I missed it, or maybe Epic just likes to keep quiet). Here’s a short excerpt from the Cerner announcement:

To me, HealthKit is about making it more convenient to manage your health and wellness, and share that information with the people that are helping you reach your goals. It’s less about trying to get real-time clinical insights or make new diagnoses. HealthyNow has the features that consumers and wellness experts are looking for in these apps, and by integrating with HealthKit, we’ve opened up the experience to a whole array of health apps for our members to choose from. This integration enables the feeding of key health metrics into our platform for sharing with health coaches, earning of incentive points, and identification of new opportunities to improve your health. By promoting healthier habits, consumers lower their premiums, health plans reduce their spend on treating avoidable diseases, and everyone lives a healthier life. (emphasis added)

The details on what Apple’s HealthKit would really do have been pretty foggy. Although, this paragraph illustrates where I figured HealthKit was going. Notice the part of the quote where I added emphasis. Cerner is just looking to suck data from HealthKit into Cerner. Maybe they have future plans to make Cerner data available to HealthKit, but the announcement seems to say they haven’t done so yet. This one way interface is exactly why I’m skeptical that HealthKit will really have a huge impact on healthcare.

What do you think? Have any of you integrated with HealthKit? I’d love to see if you have other views of where HealthKit might be headed.

October 1, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.