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Has the Smartphone Become So Usable that Anyone Can Use One?

We’ve long heard about how seniors didn’t have smartphones and so they wouldn’t have access to all these incredible mobile health apps and sensors that are tied to the smartphone. In some respects this is true and I’ve always argued that it didn’t really matter, because their caregivers (often their children) is going to be the one using it and they use smart phones. It’s an important discussion since our seniors make up a large chunk of healthcare spending.

This tweet from David Doherty had me stop and think about this subject again.

It’s true that in many ways the tablets and smartphones have gotten so easy to use that even older people are using them for all sorts of amazing things. Would you rather teach a senior to use an iPad or a desktop computer? As someone who once was hired by an elderly couple to teach them how to use their computer in college, I’d much rather have taught them how to use the iPad or smartphone. It would have been so much easier.

We have to remember that Seniors still have an insatiable desire to be connected to the ones they love. That’s why they care about these technologies and are willing to learn them. Adding on some health related applications is an easy next step.

I still think there’s an interesting market out there for customized tablets for seniors that make them even easier, but like David it’s interesting to see how tablets and smartphones have become so usable that seniors of all ages are using them. This trend will only increase and more seniors will be using this technology.

August 18, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The $5 Billion Eye and Gesture Tracking Sensor Market

Eye Tracking and Gesture Tracking Sensors

$5 Billion is a huge number for the eye and gesture tracking sensor market. It’s amazing how these markets slowly creep up until they become something huge. There are a number of really interesting startups that are working on eye and gesture tracking sensors.

This news is particularly interesting as Samsung just announced the Galaxy Note 7 will include iris scanning. It will help secure the device, but will also be available in other apps in the phone so that you have a true single sign on with your iris. We’ll see if they open it up for eye tracking applications as well.

As you look at the development curves of these technologies, we’re still in the very early stages. That’s what gets me most excited. The eye is indeed a window into our health in many ways. I can’t wait to see the new health innovations that come from it. At $5 billion, that market is really starting to mature.

August 3, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Will We Be Sequencing Genomes at Home?

When I look at the digital health market, I see amazing things happening with wearable technology and digital health apps. I’m even enamored by how much impact the right text message at the right time can impact a person’s health. No doubt, I’m impressed by the simple solutions that seem obvious once someone’s actually implemented it.

While these are all impressive, I think nothing will have a bigger impact on our health than what’s happening with genomic medicine. What’s crazy to me is how quickly genomic sequencing has become accessible to everyone. The Medical Futurist, Berci Meskó, MD, PhD, shared this great National HUman Genome Research Institute chart which illustrates how quickly the cost to sequence a genome has dropped.

Cost of Genome Sequencing Over Time

In Berci’s post he suggests that one day soon it will cost more to mail in your sample than it costs to actually sequence your genome. Will we all have genomic sequencers in our homes like we all have thermometers today? Probably not, but given the cost curve we could if we wanted to have it.

This type of inexpensive genomic sequencing is going to change the way we’re treated by doctors. Given the pace of genomic sequencing, we’re certain to have all this genomic data before we really even know what to do with it. That’s normal since most innovations require us to have the data before we realize how that data can be used. In fact, the coolest innovations in the world often combined a whole series of small innovations. The same will be true as we extract value from our genomic data.

Have you sequenced your genome? Did it provide you any insights that were valuable to you?

July 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Virtual Reality and Treating Dizziness

Mark Cuban has a pretty amazing post that talks about his experience as an active, engaged patient in his care and how he found virtual reality helped him achieve the desired relief from dizziness that he desired. If you’ve stayed up with the virtual reality space, you’ll find this quite intriguing since virtual reality is often condemned because of the dizziness it causes. Obviously, what you’re watching on VR matters a lot.

Go ahead and read Mark’s full post to see his experience as an active patient trying to deal with his Dizziness. We’ll be here when you get back. You can also watch this video he made:

It’s pretty amazing how active Mark Cuban was in his care. Sure, he has the money to be as active as possible. He literally was looking at buying a massive medical device or even investing in a business to bring the treatment he wanted to Dallas. That’s extraordinary and something that most of us can’t do as patients.

For those who haven’t read the whole story, Mark Cuban was getting treatment in California that was helping him with his dizziness from Dizziland.com. However, he couldn’t stay in California to finish the treatment. That’s when he discovered that the Samsung VR set he had might be the solution to creating a portable solution for him. Turns out, it did the trick for him. As a true businessman, he’s now working with the company to commercialize the product.

To be clear, this device setup is not FDA approved. It’s something that Mark found and tried that worked for him. We won’t be seeing doctors prescribing this for a while to come. Although, it will be interesting to see if and how solutions like this do go to market. Will they need to be FDA approved? Will they be regulated? How much will they cost? Lots of interesting questions since the videos and technology to watch them are quite cheap.

I love the story of technology making an impact on someone’s health for good. I also love seeing an active patient taking a serious interest in their care. Although, it’s amazing how a billionaire’s interest in their health is similar to any person with a major health issue.

July 20, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Balance of Moving Fast and Not Breaking Things

The right path forward for the digital health industry begins with a significant shift in the Silicon Valley mindset: “Move fast and break things” just won’t work. Source

That’s a powerful quote from Vic Gundotra, CEO of AliveCor. He’s right that you have to be much more careful in healthcare. That’s not always true. You can experiment on certain parts of healthcare without damaging a patient or a physician. However, you do have to be careful because it can quickly move into a regulated portion of healthcare. It’s a challenging balance.

Plus, even if you’re working in a regulated portion of healthcare we need to have more people who move fast and break things. They just need to do it within the regulations. While this is a challenge, it’s still possible. Plus, it becomes a massive competitive advantage when you do finally comply with all the regulations and provide value to the end user.

Vic offers this added insight:

What has been seen as a burden needs to be seen as a benefit. It’s time that we stop viewing regulatory bodies as obstacles and start viewing them as valuable partners.

In healthcare, entire industries are created around regulation. Regulations can be an enormous opportunity for entrepreneurs. That’s certainly a shift in mindset for many of those in silicon valley. Maybe that’s why so many big health IT companies come from places other than the valley.

July 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Promise of Wearables for Healthcare

In a recent interview I did with Dr. Rhew, Chief Medical Officer of Samsung, and Dr. Nick, CMO of Dell, we got this great insight from Dr. Rhew on the promise of wearables for healthcare (only takes 45 seconds):

It’s worth listening to the full discussion with Dr. Rhew and Dr. Nick so you have context, but I love how he framed the promise of wearables for healthcare. I especially like how he talks about these devices just being integrated into our lifestyle.

The challenge with this promise is that many of the current wearables have fallen short. They don’t integrate well with our lifestyle. They’re a pain to connect to get the data (although, that’s gotten better). The data they collect has questionable accuracy. The data they collect isn’t clinically relevant. I could keep going, but you get the idea.

While many of the wearables have fallen short, that’s a necessary part of the learning process. We’re going through a wearable revolution and that requires a product evolution. Many of the things we see as failings today will be considered laughable in the future.

Like Dr. Rhew, I think the promise of wearables is extremely exciting for healthcare. The integration of wearables into your lifestyle is happening. It’s not going to happen overnight, but each of these products will lay the groundwork for wearables that will become invisible to our day to day life.

June 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Perfect Description of Current Digital Health App Market

In this interview with Dr. John Torous, he perfectly describes the current digital health app market:

There are some useful apps currently available today that many patients would benefit from — and there are also some frightening ones that no one should ever use. Jennifer Nicholas of the Black Dog Institute in Australia published a paper looking at the quality of apps for bipolar disorder on the Apple and Android app stores. The results were not encouraging and to use the words from her paper, “the content of currently available apps for bipolar disorder is not in line with practice guidelines or established self-management principles.” She even found one app telling patients to drink hard alcohol if they had trouble falling asleep. Researchers have revealed similar findings for apps offering to help with substance abuse, suicide, anxiety, and depression.

We know there are many great apps out there, but there are a lot more unhelpful and even dangerous ones out there too.

This is exactly the problem today. Although, it’s worth noting Dr. Torous’ cautious words “would benefit from”. He didn’t say that digital health apps would cure disease, prevent mental health issues, solve health problems, or some other stronger statement. However, digital health apps could provide some benefit.

Although, he also points out that many of them shouldn’t be used at all. In fact, many of them could be doing a lot of damage. That’s a scary thought.

Most of the digital health apps I’ve seen are quite benign. They may not produce the desired results, but they also aren’t going to really harm a patient either. That’s the good thing, but it’s going to change. In order to differentiate themselves, these apps are going to have to do more. Along with that curve, we’re going to have plenty of digital health apps selling the digital health “snake oil” which has become so popular since the AMA talked about EHRs as digital “snake oil.”

Considering how most providers are approaching digital health, I’m not afraid that they’ll get hit with digital snake oil health apps. However, most of these apps are going straight to the consumer. That means that doctors have to know about the apps that do work, but also the apps their patients are using on their own. That’s going to make for an extremely hard situation for doctors. My guess is most will just set aside any apps they don’t know about as risky, but that has its own danger.

Regardless of whether a clinic wants to deal with digital health apps or not, they’re coming and your patients will be using them. It behooves every clinic to think about their digital health strategy.

June 22, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Using Your Mobile Trail to Improve Your Health

Mobile Health Trail

I’d always heard people talk about the value of the data collected on a mobile device and how that could be leveraged to benefit your health. However, this is the best illustration of this concept that I’ve ever seen. It’s really easy to see how much of this data could be leveraged to improve your health. There’s certainly some privacy questions, but the next generation seems to not care about it. I wonder what apps we’ll see that leverage all of this data about our habits.

June 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Will mHealth Apps Replaced by Chatbots?

Michael Yuan has a great post that looks at chatbots for healthcare and uses the great headline that “mHealth apps are so 2014!” Michael makes some great points about the challenges of getting patients to download mobile health apps and to get them to engage with those apps long term. There have been very few breakout hits in the mobile health app space.

For those not familiar with Chatbots, they essentially use artificial intelligence to appropriately respond to you on your favorite chat platform (Facebook Messenger, Kik, Whatsapp, Wechat (China), Google Messenger etc etc etc). Some of you may have seen my post about the way a Chinese Health Tracker integrates with WeChat. There are some really incredible benefits of engaging a patient on a messaging platform that they’re using daily already.

I think that most people just fear that messaging platforms aren’t powerful enough to really engage the patient. They often ask, can a text message change patient behavior? If you look at the WeChat integration mentioned above, you’ll see that most of these messaging platforms are becoming much more than just a set of simple text messages. However, let’s set that aside and just think about the power of a text message.

When Facebook announced their new partner program to allow people to create chatbots on their messaging platform, I asked my friend Melissa McCool from STI Innovations and MindStile if you could change people’s behavior with something as simple as a series of text messages. Her answer was a simple, “Yes.”

Of course, the devil’s in the details, but I trust that Melissa knows about how to influence patient behavior based on her experience doing it in many large healthcare organizations. The challenge isn’t technical though. Sending a text message, building a chat bot, sending a message on any of these platforms is completely academic. My 12 year old son could do it. What’s hard is what you should send, when you should send it and to whom.

While it’s great to see technology become easier and easier, that hasn’t made the challenge of behavior change that much easier. Sure, it’s great that the patient will actually read the message the majority of the time if you send it using one of these popular messaging apps. However, that doesn’t mean that the message will be effective. We still have a lot of work to send the right messages at the right time in the right way to the right people.

May 26, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Is Healthcare Overhead Holding Back New #DigitalHealth Solutions?

Earlier this year I wrote an article that questioned whether the Fitbit was really a digital health solution. I essentially came to the conclusion that Fitbit’s health data wasn’t clinically relevant and so that’s why we didn’t see it really impacting healthcare as we know it.

While Fitbit’s data may not be clinically relevant, Fitbit has still gone on to be an extremely successful wearable technology solution for consumers. For some reason we enjoy tracking our steps whether it really improves our health or not. Of course, maybe they’re also riding our own misconception that tracking steps improves health. Regardless, they’ve been extremely successful and haven’t had to prove that they actually do anything to move the needle in healthcare.

I wonder if this is the model that we’ll see happen most with digital health solutions. Instead of trying to actually take part in the ruthless, brutal, and complex healthcare infrastructure, I expect we’ll see most digital health solutions work on the outside.

Think about the overhead that comes with becoming FDA cleared or the overhead that comes with proving to a hospital that your solution really does improve patients’ health. That’s a lot of work compared with just creating the illusion of health and selling it directly to consumers. Maybe the illusion will play out as reality or maybe it will not. From a company’s point of view, all you have to do is keep the illusion in play and you can be successful.

No doubt this later strategy appeals to the startup culture that’s been created in the US. There’s so little that’s “lean startup” of MVP (minimum viable product) in healthcare. Most people in healthcare are afraid of anything that’s not mature. Healthcare regulations certainly discriminate against experimentation and show bias to mature technologies.

The only case that really can be made to entrepreneurs who want to pursue the harder path of proving their technologies is that once they’ve proved it they have a great defense against competitors who haven’t gone to that effort. That’s a powerful incentive, but not one that most will appreciated when starting a digital health startup company.

My gut tells me that the complexities of healthcare are holding many innovations from happening in healthcare. That’s unfortunate.

May 18, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.