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Is Innovation Missing at MGMA 2016?

This week I’ve been at the MGMA Annual Conference in San Francisco. It’s been a very interesting event with a ton of people that really want to improve healthcare. I’m always impressed by these practice administrators passion for their work and their desire to do what’s right for patients.

While I love their passion, I can’t help but feel that there’s a clear lack of innovation at MGMA. More specifically the practice executives and not the MGMA organizations itself. Instead of trying to figure out and participate in new business models that will take their practice to the next level, most healthcare practices seem focused on optimizing their existing practice.

Sure, many of them are focused on various government regulations like MACRA. In fact, I’d suggest that most of them are too focused on government regulations. No doubt that’s part of why healthcare executives at MGMA aren’t focused on innovation. They’re too busy dealing with government regulation to be able to have time to sit down and think how they could take patient care to the next level or create new business models.

The two places I do think we see some interest in innovation is the shift to value based reimbursement and the change to direct primary care. The problem with value based care is that people don’t really know what that’s going to be. Most are in wait and see mode to see where it’s all going to go. Direct primary care is quite interesting to many, but that largely only applies to primary care and many feel it’s limited in which primary care practices can and should participate (I know that many people firmly disagree with this idea).

I guess that means that MGMA stands in somewhat stark contrast to many of the other healthcare conferences out there. Maybe that’s not such a bad thing. We need to optimize our current processes as well. I just think that many of these medical practice executives would benefit from more effort talking about where healthcare is heading in the future.

It’s great that patients can now schedule an appointment on a physician website. However, are practices ready for appointments to be auto scheduled based on personal device data or through a simple request through Amazon’s echo? I know that’s ahead of the curve, but it’s not that far off either.

November 2, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Patient Forms for the Impatient – How mobile patient forms can increase patient satisfaction

The following is a guest blog post by Bogdan Lupu.

I work in a technology company. Most of my friends work in companies either handling technology or providing technology related services. In our day to day work it’s all about optimizing, streamlining and getting things to improve even if only by a little. It’s become a habit whenever dealing with something to ask the question, well how could this be better?

Now, having said all that, whenever I must go to the doctor or have a routine check I expect it to take up a whole day. That’s not true most of the times, but everything from the thought of making the appointment, being scheduled weeks after and then filling out the endless stream of forms make me feel impatient even before picking up the phone.

Imagine my surprise when I had to do a routine eye check-up and was told to book an appointment online on the clinic’s website.
patient-registration-form
The first thing I noticed was that the mobile appointment form was perfectly optimized for my phone. I could press everything without having to zoom in and out and it felt somehow natural.

The good surprises came rolling after. I got the scheduling confirmation directly via email and a link to save it in my calendar. After arriving and being greeted by the polite receptionist by name, I was asked to just go in and see the doctor. Having already filled out all the required information  when scheduling the appointment, there was no need for any other paper forms.

After my visit, I got an email and I was kindly asked to fill out their patient satisfaction survey.

It seems that customer experience is now a priority within the healthcare sector with patient engagement and secure data collection as their top priorities.

I’m looking forward to my next annual check-up.

October 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A Patient Engagement Company Could Be Anything

I’ve been spending the past couple days at the Connected Health Symposium in Boston. After talking to hundreds of people I was realizing my problem with companies saying that they are a patient engagement company. If you tell me you’re a patient engagement company, then I have no idea what you do.

The same isn’t true for an EHR company. If you say that you’re an EHR company, then I know that you’re helping doctors chart electronically. Sure, some people have used that term incorrectly or have executed poorly, but we all basically know what a company is doing if they’re an EHR company. Same is true for revenue cycle management companies and practice management software vendors.

The same can’t be said for patient engagement companies. If you say that you do patient engagement, that could literally be anything. In fact, is every company a patient engagement company?

I think we should banish the term patient engagement when describing a company. Instead, companies should tell us how they’re engaging the patient. Then, we can have an idea of what you’re doing and be able to understand how you fit into the healthcare ecosystem.

Just to be clear, I’m not suggesting we shouldn’t engage patients. Absolutely not. We 100% should be doing patient engagement. However, there are 1000s of ways that we can engage patients and many of them don’t involve technology at all. Those can all be great things, but it’s not a category of software companies.

October 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

What’s Your Digital Burden?

John Halamka has a pretty interesting blog post out there that talks about his decision to reduce his digital burden. I love his approach, because unlike so many people it’s a very reasonable approach to simplifying his online and social media life. Most people that write a blog post like his say stuff like “I’m quitting social media” or “I’m getting off the internet.”

While I understand the emotion, I think those decisions are usually really dumb decisions (with a few safety exceptions). When you take an all or nothing approach to social media and life online, then you often throw the baby out with the bathwater. The wiser move is to take a much more sophisticated approach to social media and your online life. Save the parts that add value and cut the pieces that don’t.

I understand that this can be a lot easier said than done, but it’s certainly possible. In fact, I’d argue that it’s necessary for your own sanity. If you don’t then your digital burden will creep up and your health and well being will suffer.

As I look into the future of health apps, one of the most important features of that future is letting technology filter those things that don’t matter. Plus, it needs to bubble up to the top those things that do matter. Technology does a poor job of this today, but it will get there.

What I find interesting is that John Halamka has ended with a similar result as me with one exception. I still do a ton on LinkedIn and he shut down his account. Granted, we have very different goals. Plus, I think he could still glean a lot of value from LinkedIn if he’d have approached it the right way. We definitely do align when it comes to personal/work email, Twitter, blogs (I guess I have a few more blogs than he does), and Facebook.

I’ve often argued for a dive in and optimize approach to social media platforms. Spend a month or two diving into a social media platform you don’t know. Then, once you understand the nuances of that community, optimize your efforts in it. In some cases that means you stop doing it all together. In other cases you automate certain things that matter to you. In other cases, you casually participate. Every once in a while you add it to your phone’s home screen and it becomes a daily habit.

We all know about digital burden. Cutting out the weeds is good housekeeping. That’s a progressive idea and not regressive as some may suggest. The key is being honest with yourself about what’s a week and what’s a flower.

October 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Factors Related to Digital Health Adoption

Is it any wonder that digital health adoption isn’t happening quicker? It’s complex. Check out this great graphic and paper that was shared by John Torous, MD:
provider-perceptions-of-mhealth

What I find most interesting is that it seems like the biggest negatives are the human environment and the organizational environment. I’d translate that to mean that patients and healthcare organizations are holding back these digital health options.

What will it take to change these environments? Will they change?

October 5, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Future of Healthcare Depends on Partnerships


This tweet from Estrella Jaramillo (See her @HelloBwom app) quoting the incomparable Rasu Shrestha (@RasuShrestha) really stuck with me when I read it. I agree 100% with the concept that partnerships will determine the destiny of most healthcare organizations. It’s very clear that one organization is not going to be able to do everything they have to do in healthcare.

What scares me about this idea is that many healthcare organizations aren’t embracing it. Many healthcare organization and even their partner health IT companies don’t embrace the idea of partnerships. Instead, they think they can build everything themselves. They sincerely believe that a single source system is the best thing for the future of healthcare.

This type of arrogant attitude is going to leave these organizations behind. In the short term, a single source system is better. However, once the community starts innovating and integrating, these single source systems start to fall behind and fall behind quickly.

I’m reminded of a popular African proverb (at least I think that’s the source) that Dr. Nick shared on Facebook recently “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go further, go together.” Too many in healthcare are playing the short game. That’s going to eventually catch up to them.

September 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Growth of the Wearables Market Dominated by Healthcare

wearable-market-growth

This chart illustrates an incredible explosion in the wearables market and illustrates how it’s likely to continue to grow for years to come. The big takeaway for me is how healthcare totally dominates these graphs. The two biggest growth markets for wearable are “Healthcare” and “Sports/Activity Trackers.” Many would argue that Sports/Activity trackers should be included in healthcare. That’s amazing.

The only other wearable that gets reasonably close is the smart watches, but even those could be argued as healthcare devices as well. Sure, they do a lot more, but they all have some sort of health component to them as well.

I’m going to point to these graphs from now on when I talk about the impact of wearables on healthcare. Although, I guess I could also say that the wearables market is largely healthcare. I’m excited by this continued growth and I still think we’re just getting started on what will be possible. Watch out for wearables major impact on healthcare. I think it’s inevitable.

September 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

American Well Patents Are Unenforceable

Good news today for the telemedicine industry as the federal courts ruled that American Well’s telemedicine patents are unenforceable in their case against Teladoc. Here’s an excerpt from Mobi Health News on the decision:

It’s looking more and more like the path to victory in the major turf wars of digital health will not be through patent litigation.

Earlier this week, a Massachusetts federal judge Indira Talwani ruled that American Well’s telehealth patents, which the company had sued Teladoc for allegedly infringing, were unenforceably broad. She cited the same Supreme Court precedent, Alice v. CLS Bank, that an ITC judge used to invalidate Jawbone’s patents last month in the tracker company’s battle with Fitbit.

I love the way Jonah Comstock from Mobi Health News described the decision. The path to victory won’t be based on patent litigation. Let’s hope that Jonah is right since patent litigation is an awful way to create a market. That’s true for telemedicine and the health sensor market. There’s a supposed PHR patent out there which needs to be invalidated the same way.

As you can see, I’m not a huge fan of software patents. It’s pretty hard to make the case for the innovation that you’re really trying to accomplish. Plus, far too many software patents are held by patent trolls. In this case, it’s a bit better since American Well has built a legitimate telemedicine business and isn’t just relying on their patent. That’s a good thing and it’s healthy to have Teladoc, American Well, MDLive and others battling it out in the market.

I’m glad to see the federal courts ruling on this. American Well is looking to appeal the decision, so it’s not over yet, but I’m hoping the result of their appeal is the same. We’ll all be better with that patent being unenforcable.

September 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Speed of Innovation in Mobile Networks – Enabling The Future of Healthcare

I’ve been attending the CTIA Super Mobility Conference in Las Vegas today and it’s been eye opening to say the least. The efforts they’re making to make wireless networks work for the IOT (internet of things) and even things like drones is incredible. Much of the buzz at the event has also been around the coming 5G networks.

Matt Grop EVP and CTO at Qualcomm offered this comparison of the progression from voice to 4G LTE to 5G:

Later, Rajeev Suir, President and CEO of Nokia, then suggested that we need 5G networks because the applications of the future will require it. This is an interesting statement to consider. Today during my Healthcare API discussion the need for faster connections came up and illustrated how healthcare could benefit from this additional speed. In fact, the innovations in healthcare are likely going to be facilitated or even demand the faster speeds to become a reality.

Think about neural networks and genomic medicine. That type of processing isn’t going to happen on the phone. The data for those won’t be stored on your phone, laptop, or desktop. It’s going to be stored and processed in the cloud and then sent back to your phone. The exchange of data that is going to need to happen is going to be huge and we’re going to need really fast networks to enable this future.

Think about all of the sensor data that is going to be reporting up to the cloud to be processed by these neural networks and pharmacogenomic processing engines. We’re not going to plug in to transfer this data. It’s going to use these ubiquitous wireless networks that currently connect our smart phones.

This all certainly leads to a fascinating future. I love the way technology can open the door to opportunities that would have never been thought possible previously. New high speed mobile networks like 5G are an example of that. The only question is if even 5G will be fast enough.

September 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Need for Consumer Health and Employer Health to Collide

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

A Towers Watson study looked at telehealth services that are offered by large employers. The main study result isn’t that surprising: more employers are offering telehealth services and more employers plan to offer telehealth services. This is part of a much larger trend where employers realize that easy access to health services is great for their employees and their business.

What was a bit surprising from the study was that despite offering telehealth services, many of the employees of these large companies aren’t actually using those services. Here’s how Megan Williams described this finding on the Insights blog:

The Towers Watson study in particular highlights one of the greatest challenges employers face in realizing the full benefit of telemedicine solutions — awareness. Many employees aren’t even aware of traditional options, so it’s highly likely that their options of digital health tools are being overlooked.

Why is it that consumers don’t realize the full breadth of telehealth options their employer provides?

The problem here is that most of us don’t look to our employer for healthcare. We look to them for insurance, but not health care. We don’t expect our employer to take an active interest in our health. In fact, often our employer would step away from suggesting “the best” doctors to us and just provide us the list of in-network doctors. It was up to us as patients to figure out who was “best.”

Given this dynamic, we’ve had to figure out how to navigate the healthcare system on our own. We were more likely to discover a new healthcare option through email, Facebook or Twitter than we were through our employer. To date, telehealth services have largely been consumer driven and so it’s no surprise that most patients discover telehealth services through other consumers and not their employer.

Will the day finally arrive that the consumer health options we seek overlap with the employer health options that my employer supports? I think we’re heading that direction. In the telemedicine space, for example, we’re starting to see some dominant industry players emerge. Large companies will only need to support a small set of telemedicine companies to cover their entire workforce and allow their employees to discover and use whichever telemedicine service they find on their own.

Patients’ interest in telehealth services will only continue to grow. Each of us has a smartphone in our pocket and we’re used to getting the answers to all our questions wherever we are and whatever we may be doing. The same is true for our health. Our health choices will be more influenced by our smartphone than our employer. That’s why employers need the consumer health and employer health worlds to collide.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

August 31, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.