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Noninvasive 3D Heart Mapping System

Last week, Medtronic got FDA approval for their CardioInsight™ Mapping Vest.

I’ll admit that many of the technical details of the CardioInsight product are well above my health knowledge, but those that are interested should go and read Heather Mack’s article on mobihealthnews to get more detail.

What I do get is that this new FDA cleared device can create a 3D map of your heart using 252 electrode sensors and doesn’t require a doctor to insert a catheter to get a cardiac map of the heart. That’s pretty impressive technology and it’s great that it’s already been FDA cleared.

While I can see how this will be extremely valuable when identifying the origin of arrhythmias, I’m interested to see what other data this device will be able to collect and the insights that will come from that data. I also love that this non-invasive approach is much better for the patient on a number of levels including not having to have to spend time and be stressed over an invasive clinical procedure.

For a while, I’ve suggested that we’re still in the very early days of health sensors. This heart mapping vest seems to be a nice step forward in that progression. I can’t see us wearing one of these in our homes, but we may be able to use it discover what insights matter and develop consumer-based sensors that you would use in the home.

What will they think of next? Actually, that’s the most exciting part of working in digital health.

February 9, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Possible Healthcare Chatbot Use Cases

As I posted in November, I’m extremely interested in chatbots as the next evolution of patient communication. In fact, I’m expecting to see a lot of chatbot talk at HIMSS 2017 in a couple weeks. I should have scheduled a healthcare chatbot meetup at HIMSS17, but didn’t. However, I expect the concept will come up in my other HIMSS 2017 meetups. The idea is finally catching on.

As part of my chatbot learning, I came across David Hawig from Germany who has created a healthcare chatbot named Florence. Florence is still in the early stages, but you can already talk with Florence over Facebook Messenger, and David has an early Skype version and web version as well. I personally used the web version for my tests, but David said that the only real publicly released version is the Facebook Messenger version of Florence because Facebook “messenger has the best chatbot integration so far.”

What I find really interesting and inspiring are these chatbot screenshots that David sent me. I liked them because they inspire me and hopefully you to start thinking about all the ways a healthcare chatbot could help us. Here’s a quick run down of the examples he shared with me:

Daily Health Tips

Doctor Finding Service (with Connection to past record)

Medication Reminder and Tracking

Health Tracker

Health Literacy and Education

Symptom Checker

What do you think about all of these possible uses for chatbots? Are there any others that are missing? Which chatbot uses make the most sense to implement right away?

February 1, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Alexa, Can You Heal Me Now? The Power of Voice Assistant Technology in Healthcare

On Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 1:00 PM ET (10:00 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with Nathan Treloar, President and COO at Orbita. In our discussion, we’ll be diving into voice assistant technology in healthcare including the breakout hit from Amazon known as Alexa. This has so much potential in healthcare. Join us as we talk about Alexa and other voice assistant technologies in healthcare and how more organizations can leverage voice assistant technology in their product offerings.

The great part is that you can join my conversation live and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask your own questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 1:00 PM ET (10:00 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of this post or you can watch on YouTube directly. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

About Nathan Treloar
Nate Treloar is co-founder and president of Orbita, which provides the first secure (HIPAA-compliant) cloud-based platform for creating and managing digital home healthcare applications. Previously, he held key executive positions at FAST Search, Microsoft, RAMP, and, Ektron. He is a respected expert and speaker on consumer IoT trends, search, text and data mining, content management, and knowledge management and has advised hundreds of the world’s largest companies and government agencies on their applications.

We hope you’ll join us live using the video below or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation.


(To Ask Questions, visit the YouTube page)

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

January 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Is the New Clinic, Forward, Only Reasonable for the Silicon Valley Elite?

A new clinic has been opened in San Francisco called Forward which is an attempt to reinvent the doctor’s office by several dozen former employees of Google, Facebook, Uber, and Palantir. On the one hand, this new clinic is an amalgamation of all the innovation that’s been happening in the digital health space. On the other hand, it seems to illustrate Silicon Valley excess and culture. Let’s take a look at each perspective.

Forward starts the patient experience with an iPad sign in that’s setup looks a lot like the Apple Store. It sounds like they’ve built all new software for their clinic, but tablet check in or other kiosk check in options have been in healthcare for quite a while. After checking in on the iPad, the patient then goes to a body scanner that identifies you using 2 fingers and then gathers your height, weight, body temperature, heart rate and the amount of oxygen in your blood. All of this data is available to doctors today, but this is a novel way to collect the data that likely saves time for patients and the clinic staff.

The exam rooms look like a really well designed exam room, but still feel like an exam room you might go to in most doctor’s offices. However, one notable feature of the exam room is a massive touch-screen display on the wall.

What makes the exam room and this touch screen unique is that the exam room listens to what’s being said in the room and pulls out information for the medical record and displays that information on the screen in real time. This sounds a lot like what I described in my Video EHR idea. The screen will also show the patient’s health history including sensor data and suggests diagnoses and treatment plans. How well it does at this is a good question, but in true Silicon Valley fashion I’m sure it’s an MVP (Minimum Viable Product) that will improve over time.

Many are touting Forward’s unique approach to Urine Sample collection, but this has been done in many other offices for years. Is this really an issue? I don’t think so. Forward also has essentially a health store as well that sells everything from wearable sensors to vitamins and supplements to skin care products. This has a kind of Apple Store feel as well. This can be a great revenue stream for clinics. Eventually you can imagine all of these items being ordered at the doctor’s office and delivered to your house or office by drone. Until then, UPS/FedEx/USPS will have to do.

As you can imagine, all of the biometric data that’s collected at check in, lab results, etc syncs up with a mobile app that the patient can use to access their health data. Looks like they have plans for genomic data as well. Forward has also committed to responding to messages from it’s members (yes, they call you members, not patients) within 1 minute day or night. I wonder if that response is a real human or an AI bot.

As I mentioned, this feels like an amalgamation of everything that’s been happening with digital health. If you’ve followed the digital health space, then you’ve seen almost all of these things done individually somewhere already. This isn’t necessarily a knock on Forward. The iPhone largely was an incorporation of a bunch of innovations that were available elsewhere. However, Apple packaged it nicely into an extremely usable package. Is that what Forward’s done here? I personally think that’s overstating things since they haven’t completely transformed the model (yet?), but it has made a high end medical office experience.

That leads to my second observation about Forward. In many ways, Forward just looks like Silicon Valley excess in the same vein as the over engineered $1500 Smart Oven. How many of the things mentioned above actually improve your care or inspire you to be healthier and how many of them are just for show?

I guess you could make the case that the whole package makes for a better experience that makes you want to go to the doctor, but that’s butting up against a massive desire we all have of not going to the doctor that’s been built into our DNA for years. Plus, the package doesn’t seem like it’s reached the nirvana of treating healthy patients, but instead is just a high end doctor visit experience.

I’m not suggesting that there’s anything wrong with creating a high end doctor visit experience. That very well could work in wealthy areas like Silicon Valley and other areas of the country like New York and LA. That very well could be a good business (although, my guess is they raised too much money for that to be their only business), but it’s not going to transform healthcare as we know it. I don’t see how Forward scales down to the lower end of the market. They should go and talk with ZDoggMD about his experience with Turntable Health which he just had to shut down. They could learn a lot from his experiences.

I’m not saying that no good will come from the Forward experience. It’s quite possible that the Forward clinic is used as an incubation lab for new ideas which the company can then commercialize and sell to the rest of the medical world at a reasonable price. Their excess could produce learnings that could benefit the rest of healthcare if they package it the right way and don’t just try to build a new health care system themselves. That would be an incredible outcome for healthcare.

I know every doctor would rejoice at the idea of a smart patient wall that listened to their interaction with the patient and did the proper documentation for them. That’s the face to face interaction for which doctors and patients now yearn. The big challenge here is that Forward doesn’t have to worry about things like insurance reimbursement, meaningful use, and MACRA. So, will their technology apply to the rest of healthcare? Or does it just enable the high end unlimited primary care model that they’re executing today?

Also, Forward is only working on primary care, wellness, and men’s and women’s health. That still leaves specialists in the regular insurance controlled world (Yes, you still need insurance and the $149/month membership to Forward). Can high quality primary care change healthcare? I think it could, but it’s going to take a shift in mindset (payers, employers, patients, doctors) by many for it to happen.

I know another medical practice in San Francisco that built their practice on the back of cash patients who got a great, fast customer experience. Employers in San Francisco were happy to pay cash for the visit because they knew their employee would be off work at the doctor’s office for less time then traditional healthcare paid for largely by insurance. The cash cost of a visit was much less than having that employee away from work. San Francisco is a unique culture and so that worked for this medical practice and Forward could work in San Francisco as well. I just don’t see the path for them to scale the clinic model across the country. I hope they don’t try, but instead focus on spreading their innovations across the country. If all that fails, at least the Silicon Valley elite now have an opportunity to network with other Silicon Valley elite at the doctor’s office.

January 19, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Disappointing Digital Health Experience at CES

This was the 11th or 12th year I’ve attended CES. Living in Las Vegas, it’s easy for me to attend and enjoy the tech playground that is CES. It’s a fun experience for nerds like me to see all the amazing technology. Plus, it’s been fascinating watching the evolution of the event over the year.

When I first started attending CES over a decade ago, there was basically no digital health at the conference. This year, the digital health and fitness section of CES took up probably 1/3 to half of the Sands Convention Center. That’s a huge difference. It’s really like the digital health industry grew from nothing right before my eyes. Turns out the same is true for a bunch of other industries like 3D Printing, Virtual Reality, and Drones to name a few.

While I always get value connecting with many of the people that attend CES, I have to admit that the digital health experience at CES this year was an extremely disappointing experience for me. I did meet a few companies that I’ll write about in the future, but for the most part innovation really seemed to be lacking. I’d describe most of the growth as me too products and big flashy look at us booths.

The former is to be expected. The me too nature of technology always happens. However, the later is what was so disappointing. As I walked by hundreds of booths, they didn’t communicate any sort of unique and interesting innovation. There was a lot of flash and show, but the substance of what was new, interesting, innovative, game changing, etc was totally missing from the experience. Is that because they weren’t doing anything that unique and interesting? I’m afraid that’s the case for many of them.

Given the fact that CES has something like 1 million square feet of exhibit space, I’m sure there was a lot of innovation happening. However, on the digital health side it all felt very incremental to me. Maybe there were some really amazing innovations that were hiding. Or maybe I couldn’t hear about those innovations because the club music in the Under Armour booth was too loud.

I still enjoyed CES because of some of the people who I met with during the event. It’s just too bad the booths have headed towards sizzle and forgot about the steak.

January 11, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Genomics as the Next “Information Technology” Investment Category

Many of you know that I read various venture capital blogs as my hobby. My favorite is Fred Wilson’s blog. I’ve gleaned so much from his blog that’s helped me personally and professionally. When I know I have some blogs from Fred in my feed reader (which I usually do since he blogs every day), it’s like anticipating a delicious dessert since I know reading his blogs will be a fun experience (yes, I’m a nerd like that).

My Fred Wilson fandom aside, I was fascinated by Fred’s 2017 predictions including this one about genomics:

Tech investors will start to adopt genomics as an additional “information technology” investment category, blurring the distinction between life science and tech investors that has existed in the VC sector for the past thirty years. This will lead to a funding frenzy and many investments will go badly. But there will be big winners to be had in this sector and it will be an important category for VCs for the foreseeable future.

The timing for this is interesting since this week is CES. Last year at CES I moderated a panel on genomics. I led off the panel by saying, “Thanks for coming in from looking at all the iPhone cases to talk about something a little more substantial.” Needless to say, I’m quite bullish on what’s going to be possible with genomics. Although, I think Fred might be a little ahead of the curve on when tech and genomics will merge.

What’s interesting is that there should be an overlap in tech and genomics. How is creating some sort of healthcare analytics any different than doing the same with genomic data? Certainly, you could argue that genomic data is much more challenging and complex, but at the end of the day it’s still about culling through and understanding the data. For some reason though when we say genomics we think that it’s a unique class of investment. In most cases, it’s shouldn’t be all that different.

I do think Fred is spot on when he talks about many genomic investments going badly and many of them being big winners. In that way, it kind of feels more like pharma investment than it does technology. Maybe that’s why people feel like genomic medicine investments aren’t technology investments.

It’s going to be fun to see the genomic market play out. I’m also interested in the companies that are going to make our efforts available to a much broader group of people. I imagine that’s the type of investments that Fred Wilson and USV would like to make. They aren’t likely as interested in investing in the genomic findings, but the genomic tools that will empower anyone to make a genomic discovery. Or possibly the platform that will share and commercialize genomic findings. Those are both really interesting areas that I bet hits Fred’s investment themes well.

January 4, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Is Going to Benefit from the Confluence of Consumer Technologies

Next week is the annual CES conference in Las Vegas. It’s a unique event that brings together 170,000 people across 4 of the largest conference venues in the world. It’s enormous and a little hard to process.

Having attended for the last ~11 years, it’s been amazing to see the pace of progress with so many technologies. Remember that it’s only been about 9 years since the iPhone was launched. While smartphones and tablets have gotten so much better over this time period a whole slew of other consumer technologies have as well.

Looking forward to CES, it’s amazing to see the development of things like: 3D Printing, Virtual Reality, Augmented reality, IoT (Internet of Things…or as I like to call it Smart Everything), voice recognition, AI, robotics, sensors, etc etc etc. It’s an exciting time to be in an industry where so many things are developing so quickly.

Maybe I’m skewed because I’m a blogger in healthcare, but it’s really amazing how healthcare sits at the confluence of so many of these technologies. The overlap that’s going to happen between augmented reality, 3D printing, AI, sensors and new things we barely understand is going to be extraordinary.

I recently saw a 3D printing conference for healthcare. While 3D printing is very exciting for healthcare, it wouldn’t be nearly as exciting if we didn’t have all of the other innovations in cameras, storage, data sharing, virtual reality, etc. We needed evolutions and innovations in all of these spaces for the other technologies to really work well.

I’ve often said that the most interesting things in healthcare happen at the intersections. I think that’s particularly true in the digital health space. As I head to CES, I’ll be watching for this type of crossover of technologies. I think this year we’re going to see a lot of companies utilizing multiple technologies in ways we’d never seen previously.

December 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Zero Marginal Cost and Healthcare

I stumbled upon an old post from the always insightful and interesting 3G Doctor blog about the concept of ‘Zero Marginal Cost.’ Here’s a great quote they use in the post from Albert Wenger, Managing Partner at Union Square Ventures:

“Why is everyone going online? It turns out there’s a simple answer to that: Kittens. Everyone wants to see Kittens. Well there’s actually something more to this, there’s something serious to this because when I downloaded this image from Flickr there was no noticeable cost to anybody. The marginal cost of creating a copy in the digital world is zero and that is driving all the changes that we’re seeing… …and we’re just at the beginning of this change”

I love the concept of zero (or at least near zero) marginal costs. It’s the premise of so many of the amazing things we experience on the internet. What’s troubling is that healthcare hasn’t embraced the idea of zero marginal costs. At least not in the way that it could.

In healthcare, we still like to talk about how much it’s going to cost a patient to get access to their medical records. There are literally state laws which say how much you can charge. Just writing this after writing about the marginal costs of delivering something electronically makes the concept sound silly. Imagine if your bank charged you per sheet to print out your statements each month. That’s basically what we’re asked to do in healthcare.

We’ve started to see some change in this, but there’s still resistance. There’s a real, palpable feel by many in healthcare that giving free access to all of your patient info could lead to really ugly problems. While there might be a few outlier cases people could identify, I’d argue the opposite. Think about the really ugly problems that occur in healthcare because patients don’t have their health information.

It’s time for healthcare to put down their excuses and embrace the benefits that zero marginal costs of sharing health information can provide. I’m not saying we should do it recklessly. We should be thoughtful in how we do it, but we should do it. It’s no longer a technical or security challenge, it’s just a cultural challenge.

December 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Scanadu to Shut Down Scout Medical Device Per FDA Regulation

The famous Qualcomm Tricorder prize winner and IndieGogo crowdfunding success, Scanadu, has just hit some major bumps in the road. In fact, you might say they lost their engine completely. After winning the X Prize foundation’s tricorder competition, they went on to raise more than $1.6 million on IndieGogo from 8509 backers.

After shipping the product, Techcrunch just broke the news that Scanadu was now planning to disable the Scout’s functionality. Yes, that’s right. People paid $149-269 for the Scanadu Scout and now Scanadu is going to brick all of the devices. Here’s their official comment to Techcrunch:

“From the beginning of the campaign, this was an investigational device that was part of a study which has now reached its endpoint with data collection for the study ending in November 2016. FDA regulations require that all investigational studies be brought to closure and their respective devices be deactivated. As a result, we will deactivate the Scanadu Scout® devices by May 15, 2017.

Interestingly, the Scanadu website, Twitter, Facebook, etc are all quiet. In fact, most of them have been quiet since April. What hasn’t been quiet is customers anger towards Scanadu. That’s true on social media, but also in the IndieGogo comment section where Scanadu had raised $1.6 million.

You can imagine people’s anger. Their expensive device will now be useless. As one commenter pointed out, someone bought 100 of them. That person will now essentially have 100 expensive bricks. In the comments, people are calling for a class action lawsuit, refunds from IndieGogo and outrage at the company doing this to them. The most salient point is that it’s hard to imagine anyone ever buying a product from Scanadu again after something like this occurs. One commenter suggested the following:

The consent doc also says: “If you have any questions about your rights, call the Scripps Office for the Protection of Research Subjects at (858) 652-5500. ” [Note: Scripps is performing the study based on the Scanadu data.]

Some people in the comments are even commenting that there’s no such FDA regulation. I’m not an expert on FDA regulation, but my gut tells me there’s more to this story than we know today. I could easily see how there could be an FDA regulation that required a company to shut down devices that made claims they couldn’t achieve and therefore put people’s health in danger. I’m not sure if this is what’s happening with Scanadu, but when there’s smoke there’s usually fire.

I think we all loved the romanticized idea of a medical tricorder. Haven’t we all wanted one since we first saw it portrayed on Star Trek? Scanadu was trying to make it a reality, but it seems their efforts have fallen flat. This is a good warning to everyone else out there. FDA compliance is no joke. Even winning an X Prize, a successful crowd funding campaign, and raising $35 million in funding doesn’t guarantee success.

Innovation in healthcare is hard!

December 14, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Expanding World of Health Sensors

It’s been fascinating to watch the number of health sensors blow up over the years. The sad part of the last 3-5 years has been that a huge majority of the sensors that were hitting the market were essentially me too products. How many fitness trackers, blood pressure cuffs, smart scales, heart rate monitors, etc do we need. No doubt each of these products has produced some successful businesses, but have they really moved the needle on healthcare? My answer is no and that’s because these health sensors aren’t very clinically relevant.

The good thing is that I’ve started to see a wider variety of sensors that measure everything imaginable on your body. None of these have been breakout hits yet, but that’s largely because they’re trying to really measure something that’s clinically relevant versus creating a consumer toy.

There are a lot of ways to look at the health sensor market, but one way is to look at which part of the body they’re using to measure some health indicator. Here’s a list of some of the sensors I’ve seen over the past couple years (starting with the obvious ones):

  • Skin
  • Motion
  • Sweat
  • Blood
  • Eye
  • Visual
  • Brainwaves
  • Stool
  • Blood Flow
  • Spit

As you can see, there are companies working on measuring every output we produce in order to try and understand our health.  Some of these we’ve been doing forever like blood tests.  Labs are such an important part of healthcare.  However, what’s different about the latest generation of health sensors is that most of these health sensors are going direct to consumers as opposed to selling to the healthcare providers.

Think about that shift. That’s a massive change. Plus, the ironic part is that many healthcare providers are adopting and using consumer sensors in their healthcare organizations. I’m also interested in how this shift in information is going to change the balance of power in healthcare. Information is power.

Are there other sensors out there that you see coming to market? Which ones do you think will be most clinically relevant?

December 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.