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Future of Mobile Devices Infographic

The explosion of mobile devices and other connected devices is really quite astounding. It’s the start of what people call the IoT and it’s going to change everything including health care. You can see that in this Mobile Future infographic below. The thing that stood out to me was that 44ZB of data will be exchanged between connected devices by 2020. For those not familiar with ZB, that’s 1 trillion Gigabytes! Wow! Now that’s big data.

A Look at the Mobile Health Future Infographic

November 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Mobile Health Care, Rise in Deaths, and Patient First Apps – Around Twitter

Here’s a few tweets that stood out to me this week. Plus a little commentary on each.


These numbers are pretty shocking. More people get health information online than a whole slew of other popular online services. This is shocking because almost none of that health information is actually coming from providers. It’s coming from other sources.


I guess we shouldn’t be surprised by this rise in deaths. I’m not sure what health care can do to solve this rise. I think this requires a change in culture more than a change in health care. (some might argue that culture is part of health care)


The patient first mentality is an important one. I’m always surprised how many patient apps are built with very little involvement from actual patients.

November 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Fitness Tracking Apps and Cell Phone Batteries

One of the big challenges of any mobile health app is how much it drains your battery. While processing power, storage, and pretty much every other technology in a cell phone has improved the one nut we haven’t yet cracked is batteries. Although, I’m hopeful that we’re close to cracking the innovation in batteries soon too.

Until we do, battery usage is always a concern with mobile health applications. This is particularly true with passive activity tracking apps. They can suck your battery dry if they’re not designed properly and we all know how quickly apps get removed from our phones if they’re responsible for reducing our battery life.

One passive fitness tracker, Human, has tackled this problem head on. Here’s how Techcrunch describes their efforts to minimize Human’s drain on your battery:

The app now relies as much as possible on the motion coprocessor in your iPhone 5s, 6 or 6s. Human now has 50 percent less battery impact. And if you really need to get the most out of your phone, there is a new low power mode to reduce battery usage by up to 90 percent.

Until we solve the batter problems we all face, we’re going to see more effort spent on how we manage battery usage. We saw the same problem with the original Google Glass. The battery on the original Google Glass was about 30 minutes of active usage (ie. video). I read one report that Google Glass 2.0 is going to last 22 hours by comparison.

What other battery improvements do you see happening to help mobile health applications?

November 4, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Digital Health Is Hard

I love talking to entrepreneurs. I like to describe entrepreneurship as my hobby. However, the more I talk with entrepreneurs, the more I realize how hard it is to build a company. We should know this since 90% of startup companies fail. I’ve started saying that the more I learn about starting a company, the more I wonder how any companies are successful. There are so many things that can cause a startup company to fail.

I think it’s fair to say that starting a company is hard.

Now you add on the complexities of healthcare and I’d suggest that digital health is even harder. Sure there might be some other industries that compete with healthcare on how hard it is to start a company, but it would be a very competitive competition to see which industry is more competitive. The reality is that it doesn’t matter if healthcare is harder or easier than other industries. That doesn’t change the fact that creating a digital health company is hard.

There are a wide variety of digital health companies out there. However, most of them I’ve seen are focused on one of these 4 areas: Payers, Hospitals/Health Systems (Enterprises), Doctors, or Patients. There are a few other variations, but that encapsulates the majority of digital health companies out there.

Selling something to any one of these 4 groups is a real challenge. The rigor that’s required by Payers, health systems, and doctors is incredible. Plus, even if you have a product that will benefit their organization it’s such a complex sales cycle for payers and health systems that you better be in it for the long haul. There’s very rarely one gatekeeper you need to convince that your product will benefit the organization. There are multiple gatekeepers and any one of them could derail the implementation of your product and solution.

Yes, it’s a bit easier to sell directly to doctors and patients, but there are so many of them and they are getting so many messages that it provides its own unique set of challenges. Doctors do have a lot of decision making power. This is particularly true in smaller practices and solo doc practices. However, they’ve got the constant barrage of messaging from every which way that it’s hard to make your message stand out. Remember that as a digital health company you’re competing with pharma companies who literally have boots on the ground visiting every doctor. That’s tough.

In the patient space there are so many fly by night apps out there that it’s a highly competitive market. Sure, you could have a viral hit with patients and it starts spreading like wildfire, but remember that a product that spreads virally also declines at a similar rate. Plus, viral spreading of an app is rare. In fact, there’s almost always a deep amount of work, sweat and tears behind the story of “viral” success.

Of course, in this post I’ve mostly talked about the challenges of marketing your healthcare IT product. I’m probably in that state of mind as I’m planning the healthcare IT marketing and PR conference. However, it’s just as hard to build a product that actually provides provable benefit to the users across the widely diverse healthcare system.

Digital health is hard. Startups are hard. That’s why we need more entrepreneurs with the special DNA to take on hard challenges. However, don’t underestimate how hard it is to built a digital health company. Of course, all the entrepreneurs reading this will take that as a challenge or disagree with me. That’s what makes them special.

October 28, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A day in the life of a Clinician in the 2020’s

On Back to the Future Day it seems appropriate to take a look at what healthcare and the life of the doctor could look like in 2020. Here’s Intel’s take on what that might look like:

I’d love to hear your thoughts. What do you think the life of a doctor will look like in 5, 10, 20 years?

October 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

12 Health Care Startups Shaping the Future of Health Care Infographic

Who doesn’t like a list in an infographic? That said, I really like the infographic that Northeastern University put together. They highlight a number of really interesting health care startup companies that are worth watching.
Healthcare Startups Shaping the Future of Health Care

October 14, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Smart Pill Dispenser – PillBox

Marcin Michalak recently reached out to me about a Smart Pills Dispenser designed to make taking meds easier. They call it PillBox and have a kickstarter campaign you can support if you think it’s a good idea.

The PillBox is a smart pill dispenser which automatically delivers the drugs to the patient when needed at the appropriate time. It will also notify you when your drugs are running low. The app also tracks how well you’re doing at taking your medication. This is an ambitious project which requires both software and hardware. Although, I love the automation that they’re working on doing.

Speaking on a personal level, I know my wife would love to have something like this. She has to take a daily medication each morning. It would be nice to have a system that delivered her the medication each morning. In fact, it would help her remember if she’d taken the medication or not (a real challenge when you do it every day). Plus, she often forgets that she’s close to running out of meds, so a reminder would be really helpful.

One concern I’d have with the design they show is how they secure the medication that’s being dispensed. I can already imagine the PillBox dispensing the meds for my wife and my kids seeing it and thinking it’s candy. Hopefully there’s some sort of locking mechanism options for the medication to protect against that type of issue.

I’ve seen a bunch of medication compliance options out there. However, most of them suffer from some sort of cumbersome way to track the compliance. I really like the medication automation that PillBox is working on. I hope their Kickstarter campaign is successful.

October 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

What Are We Doing to Identify the Best Health Apps?

Tom Sullivan asks a great question about mobile health apps. How many of them really matter? I coyly replied on Twitter that it’s only the ones that get used. In the article Tom Sullivan links to in the tweet above, Jack McCarthy says the following:

With some 165,000 health-related apps available, in fact, a mere 36 comprise nearly 50 percent of downloads. Not to be confused with 36 percent, that’s a total of 36 applications, according to a study by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics that analyzed 26,000 apps.

That’s pretty startling to think that 36 apps comprise half of the mobile health app downloads. However, these shear numbers aren’t really a problem on their own. I’ve seen hundreds of apps that shouldn’t have more than a few thousand users. They’re so niche that their entire target market is small.

The biggest problem I see is how are doctor or patients suppose to find these niche health apps amidst the other 165,000 health related apps. That’s like finding a proverbial in a haystack and we’re not talking about a little mini haystack, but a massive haystack.

The best we have today is great mobile health websites like mobihealthnews and iMedicalApps that do what they can to keep up with all the changes. They do a good job covering the industry, but even if they both covered 1 app a day (which is not an easy endeavor), then we’d still only learn about 730 apps a year of the 165,000 out there. That’s 0.4% of the health apps that exist or what we’d call a rounding error.

This is not an easy task. How do you filter the wheat from the chaff (and there’s a lot of chaff)? I have a feeling in the medical world that the various specialty specific medical societies will be one filter for mobile health apps. Those societies could perform a really great service for their members by identifying the health apps that apply to their specialties and helping vet those apps out.

How do you think doctors and patients will be able to filter through all the health app noise? Is this an opportunity for an entrepreneur?

September 23, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

How Your Watch Will Save Your Life Infographic

The people at Watches2U just sent me an infographic that looked at the future role of smartwatches in personal health. I’ve been very interested in how smartwatches and healthcare are going to work together and so this infographic offers a lot of good information. I think you’ll enjoy it as well. Will a watch save your life? I’m sure we’ll have cases where it does. Will it be widespread? I’m not sure about that, but it makes for a catchy title for an infographic.
How your watch will save your life - final6

September 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Airstrip’s Apple Watch Implementation of Sense4Baby

Everyone in healthcare has been watching the Apple Watch and Apple just announced the next generation of their watch. As part of the Apple Watch announcement, Dr. Cameron Powell, CMO and Co-Founder of Airstrip was on stage demonstrating the Apple Watch implementation of Sense4Baby (which Airstrip acquired). Rather than try to explain the implementation, it’s much better to see it in action:

September 10, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.