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Brainwaves and Google Glass – mHealth Summit

While at the mHealth Summit I had a chance to meet with Cerora. At first I wasn’t all that excited to see another piece of EEG hardware. I’d seen one before, and it seemed the science of it was so early that we still hadn’t seen many real world results that were worth talking about. However, when I started talking to the people at Cerora, I was impressed by their linear focus on using the hardware for just one purpose as opposed to a company with a technology that’s trying to find a solution. Plus, I love that they had plenty of clinical study background as well.

However, the device itself still wasn’t as interesting to me as how they would pair the EEG with Google Glass. Sure, Google Glass seems like just another toy, but they had a vision for how to use Google Glass that I hadn’t heard before. They were interested in using the accelerometer in Google Glass and I believe they said the eye tracking potential to be able to monitor someone’s gait. For example, when they walked were they swaying from side to side in an abnormal way.

To be honest, I may not even be doing justice to what they have in mind. However, the concept is what I found most interesting. Could Google Glass be used as an amazing health tracking device or as a health research device? I think Cerora might be on to something combining Google Glass with their EEG.

January 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Google Glass in Public

I recently acquired a pair of Google Glass. It’s been quite an interesting experience wearing them around. I haven’t worn them many places. In fact, I took them to the mHealth Summit in DC and barely took them out. As I considered it, I found it really pretentious to have on a pair of Google Glass. Even when I did wear them, I’d usually flip them up on my head so people knew I wasn’t using them.

I imagine over time this will change as more and more people wear some sort of eyeware that contains computing power like Google Glass. However, of all places, you’d think that wearing them at mHealth Summit people would generally know what they were and not be so phased when you had them on. It was interesting to see the looks people gave you.

I will say that wearing Google Glass is a good attention getter. Random people will come up to you and ask to wear them or try them. This can be a great thing at a conference where breaking the ice can be hard. However, you just have to be sure to bridge the conversation to something more than Google Glass. For some reason, women seemed particularly interested in them.

I have CES (Consumer Electronics Show) coming up in a few weeks. I think I’ll wear Google Glass around some just to see what people do. At a show like CES I’m afraid I’ll end up meeting a lot of people that I don’t necessarily want to meet (do I really care to hear about your iPhone case company?).

I’m still torn on Google Glass. I think the technology is a really amazing experience. It’s just hard for me to see it as an every day type of accessory like your phone. Maybe I’ll hop on eBay and sell mine off.

December 26, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

A #mhealth13 Twitter Roundup

As I mentioned, this week I was able to attend the mHealth Summit in DC. While the weather outside was terrible (reminds me to be grateful I live in Las Vegas), the show had a lot of really interesting people. I took some of my favorite tweets from the event and thought I’d share them with you in case you couldn’t attend.


Didn’t see too many practicing doctors at the event. See my previous post about the mHealth Digital Divide.


The word disruption sells a lot of books, but doesn’t sell a lot of health IT software.


A little health humor for those doctors who are reading this. He’s right. Not much viral spreading in healthcare IT.


This is an issue. I call them perverse incentives.


Of course, we’re still waiting for this change to happen.


It’s a little bombastic to say hospitals will be obsolete. They won’t and it won’t even be close. Even if you want to see a doc at home, there will still be procedures that need to be done somewhere (ie. at hospitals).


I guess we leave it to a song writer to play with words. I want Dr. Eisenberg as my doctor.


That will change. People reacted the same way when I was wearing Google Glass.

December 12, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

The mHealth Digital Divide

At the mHealth Summit, Steve Case offered an interesting insight about mHealth doing amazing things with mobile, but hospitals still being worried about updating Windows XP.”

This is one of my key takeaways at the mHealth Summit. There’s a large digital divide between what’s happening in the mobile health world and the reality of most healthcare organizations (Doctors and Hospitals). It would be great if those organizations would partner with these companies trying to innovate in the mobile health space, but unfortunately most are too busy focusing on all the government regulations (ie. ICD-10, meaningful use and ACOs).

What I don’t see is a bridge being built to bridge this divide. Maybe the fact that HIMSS now owns the mHealth Summit event will help. Hopefully the HIMSS audience will finally embrace what’s happening and join in on the conversation. Although, I’m betting that will happen a lot slower than we’d all like.

Anyone who’s tried to sell into healthcare (particularly hospitals) knows what a challenge that can be. Many of the companies developing these mobile health apps don’t come from healthcare. I love the outside influence and knowledge coming into healthcare, but that doesn’t mean they’ll be able to sell into healthcare. Like most enterprises, the sales process can be brutal.

December 10, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

mHealth Summit 2013

Tomorrow morning, barring snow in Las Vegas, I’ll be boarding a plane to DC to attend the mHealth Summit. This will be the third year I’ve attended the mHealth Summit. It’s the second year HIMSS has owned it and so I think this will be a breakout year for the event. Take a look at the numbers to see what I mean:

  • Over 5,000 attendees
  • Nearly 300 exhibitors
  • 450 speakers

If I’m being really honest about the event (which is basically how I am always), the keynote speakers and sessions don’t get me that excited. The one exception is Muhammad Yunus. I’m not sure what he has to do with healthcare at all, but his micro credit innovation is one of the most amazing things I’ve ever heard. I love when small, simple things that anyone could have done could have such a profound impact on society. Maybe there’s some good parallel’s we can learn from this in mHealth.

Regardless of who’s speaking, I’m certain that I’ll have a lot of great conversation with the 5,000+ attendees and my schedule is literally booked with meetings with vendors.

As with most conferences, I don’t have a specific agenda or story that I want to write at the conference. My goal is to try and discover what the story is at the conference. Is there a new trend? Is there something exciting happening that I’ve never heard about? Do we need to be concerned about something that’s going to happen?

We’ll see what I find. The great part for you is that whatever I find I’ll share with you on this blog. Let’s hope I find something interesting. I’ll be sad if I find a lack of innovation and improvement over past years.

December 6, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

mHealth Summit Next Week

We’re really excited to be participating in the mHealth Summit in Washington, DC next week. We attended the event last year and are excited to see the various technologies that will be there again this year.

I was told that they’re expecting about 4000 attendees at the conference and about 300 vendors. I’m excited to see how the conference goes post-HIMSS acquisition. So far I’ve seen nothing but good things come from the acquisition by HIMSS.

My schedule is chalk full of meetings with various mHealth companies. So, I’ll try to get as much information for you from the event as possible.

You can follow all of the happenings at the mHealth Summit on Twitter using the hashtag #mhs12. If you plan to be at the conference, I’d love to connect with you in person.

November 30, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

mHealth Alliance Opens Membership to Anyone Actively Engaged In or Interested in mHealth

The mHealth Alliance, known for putting together the annual mHealth Summit, is opening membership to anyone actively engaged in, or interested in, mobile health.  Their goal is to bring together people from all sectors to create a community of people to advance mHealth around the world.

There is no fee for membership, but there is an application which are currently being accepted at mHealthAlliance.org/membership.  The application includes conveying your interest in mHealth as well as agreeing to a set of basic principles that govern the Alliance’s collaborations in the field.

“We know the mHealth field spreads across multiple sectors and cross-cutting areas,” said Patty Mechael, Executive Director of the mHealth Alliance. “We want to engage these stakeholders to accelerate mutual learning, networking, and collaboration. By mobilizing organizations with a common interest in and vision for mHealth, we believe we will accelerate the advancement of mobile technologies in a way that improves health outcomes and systems – especially in remote areas where health information and access is severely limited.”

Social media is ruling so many areas of commerce and industry, and this is really another attempt to take advantage of that trend.  The upside of groups like this is you don’t have to wade through the mountains of useless information on sites like Facebook to find something of quality.

Creating focused communities like this are a move in the right direction in terms of using social media.  Getting everyone together, on the same page, will do wonders for advancing the future of mHealth.

February 7, 2012 I Written By

International mHealth vs. Domestic mHealth: Should Borders Define Our Efforts?

mHealth is quickly becoming one of the most exciting parts of the healthcare industry, but according to this article, there is a competitive nature between mHealth developers internationally, versus those in the US.  There are a couple of very interesting points that are made by Kate Otto in her piece.

However it is crucial to note that the world is no longer divided, and perhaps never even was, by the boundaries of America vs. the rest, or developed countries vs. developing, or rich vs. poor nations. Within every country’s borders there are marginalized communities in need of improved access to quality healthcare. And this is where the true promise of mHealth lies: in deeply understanding the needs, behaviors, and norms of people at most serious risk of disease and death.

Healthcare is by no means the only arena where there can be a sense of America vs. everyone else, but of all industries shouldn’t doctors be the ones to look past any competition, real or perceived, to do what is best for the patient?  And maybe that is the difficulty in this area: developing tools that truly benefit the patient, but are also profitable.  If there is no profit in the business why would anyone be interested in pursuing it?

Sharing and discussing research designs and methodologies is even more crucial for this fast-moving field. As several Summit sessions discussed, testing specific tools, that could be rendered obsolete in a matter of months, will be a less useful tactic than testing how phone functionalities (adaptable to different devices) can impact health outcomes.

This is something I hadn’t really considered yet seems so obvious.  Technology is developing so rapidly that what is hot news today is old hat within a month or two.  Healthcare will be no different, which is why it is essential that the focus come back to the patient and their needs.  Along those lines, it is also essential that doctors be involved in development to ensure that new developments provide real value.

But I hope that by next year’s mHealth Summit, the mHealth community’s conversations are comparing not just geographic struggles, but strategies to understand end-user experience, human behavior, and how people function before technology enters the picture, no matter where they are on the planet. That way, we can fall into line not as two separate camps of international or domestic people, but more effectively, as thepeople-people.

This summarizes the whole message quite well.  Healthcare is not something that should be compartmentalized by the borders that we have established.  People are people no matter where they are, and technology should not impact that.  All that should matter in the development of mHealth is that people are being taken care of, and their needs are being fulfilled.

December 26, 2011 I Written By